Spoiler-Free Book Review: “The Light at the Bottom of the World” by London Shah

I pre-ordered this months ago because the premise really hooked me. Nearly a hundred years in the future, London and the rest of the world are underwater, a new civilization living at the bottom of the sea. The cover was absolutely gorgeous too, so I decided to give this debut novel a shot while waiting for Voyager to arrive.

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“In the last days of the twenty-first century, sea creatures swim through the ruins of London. Trapped in the abyss, humankind wavers between fear and hope–fear of what lurks in the depths around them, and hope that they might one day find a way back to the surface.
 
When sixteen-year-old submersible racer Leyla McQueen is chosen to participate in the prestigious annual marathon, she sees an opportunity to save her father, who has been arrested on false charges. The Prime Minister promises the champion whatever their heart desires. 

But the race takes an unexpected turn, forcing Leyla to make an impossible choice.

Now she must brave unfathomable waters and defy a corrupt government determined to keep its secrets, all the while dealing with a guarded, hotheaded companion she never asked for in the first place. If Leyla fails to discover the truths at the heart of her world, or falls prey to her own fears, she risks capture–or worse. And her father will be lost to her forever.”

There was a lot I liked about this book. The thing that struck me most was that it seemed to be aimed at teenagers, perhaps around 13-16 years old, yet it had a lot of swearing in it, so I’m not sure who the target audience is. YA, perhaps? There were a lot of plot twists I didn’t see coming, which is important for a good story.

Things I Liked

  • The world-building was fantastic. Some of the scenes describing the vibrant underwater world, filled with dangers, sea creatures, and ruins of old buildings painted some vivid pictures in my mind.
  • The main character, Leyla McQueen. Some people have said Leyla is naive or makes stupid decisions, but… she’s sixteen. I actually liked her a lot. She actually feels like a sixteen-year-old; she’s a little stubborn, makes silly mistakes sometimes (but apologizes and tries to redeem herself afterward), and loves hot drinks and taking care of her puppy, Jojo.
  • The theme of family and how important it is to her.
  • The themes of a government you can’t trust. This was great and full of unexpected plot twists and revelations that I thoroughly enjoyed.

Things I Didn’t Like:

  • The prose, I felt, was the weakest thing about The Light at the Bottom of the World. Many cliches and boring language were used, a lot of the scenes went at lightning pace and didn’t allow for any real tension to build, and in one chapter Leyla’s “cheeks flooded with heat” about four times within a couple of pages. A rewrite with more detail in the action scenes would do this novel a world of good.
  • The way she and the love interest, Ari, interacted. He’s the typical brooding, serious, but very handsome and strong type, and Leyla flits between disliking him and swooning over how perfect his jawline is. I found myself skipping sentences where she was talking about his golden eyes or the way his jaw twitched. He wasn’t much of a character, and it was obvious they’d become a couple from their very first meeting.
  • The first person present tense. Why is the present tense so darn popular lately?

The Light at the Bottom of the World had loads of cool nerdy references and parts that were unapologetically British; Leyla is a huge fan of Oscar Wilde, talks about how much she loves tea. Hermione Granger and Dr Who are also mentioned. King George is also briefly said to be the last king, which was a nice touch.

Quotes

Debut novels rarely have quotes worth noting down, but there were some great ones in this one. Here are some of my favourites.

“You people… always content with your own lives no matter what’s going on with somebody else – as long as you’re fine. Always believing what you’re told.”

A real Oscar Wilde quote: “Ah, one can never be too overdressed or overeducated.”

“Maybe if we weren’t bombarded with the endless promotion of despair, we might think and feel differently about our lives.”

I also found it interesting how depression was mentioned and dealt with in this story, and I think many readers would agree that it applies to the real world, too. I actually felt the best writing was in the last few pages when Leyla is reflecting on what’s happened and we see how she’s grown.

All in all, I enjoyed this story. I feel it would appeal more to teenagers because of the writing style, and I won’t be forgetting the unique world in a hurry. I think I’ll probably buy the sequel when it comes out. I feel the weak prose let the book down the most and hope that Shah will polish her craft before writing the next one.

Three and a half stars for The Light at the Bottom of the World!

3.5stars

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Divergent” by Veronica Roth

Netflix is a goldmine of great movies, as many of us know. I watched a dystopian science-fiction movie called Divergent and within about five minutes, I just knew it was a novel first. The way the world was introduced and the sixteen-year-old character was a dead giveaway. I enjoyed the movie, and immediately ordered the book.

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“One choice can transform you. Beatrice Prior’s society is divided into five factions—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent).

Beatrice must choose between staying with her Abnegation family and transferring factions. Her choice will shock her community and herself. But the newly christened Tris also has a secret, one she’s determined to keep hidden, because in this world, what makes you different makes you dangerous.”

I jumped right into this compelling YA! We see the story from the eyes of Beatrice – or Tris, as she’s later called – and we see her faults as well as her strengths, which was refreshing. She talks about her faults without needlessly putting herself down. She knows she is brave, but also knows that she is too selfish for her parents’ faction, and is very likable.

I try not to compare movies with their books (The Vampire’s Assistant, a crappy film based on an incredible horror series, was torturous enough), but I much preferred the book to the movie. More of what Tris did and said made sense, as most of the logic happened in her head and was difficult to portray on screen.

The world was original. It was set at some point in the future in a city, presumably in the United States, after a war has torn the world apart. Instead of the overused post-apocalyptic scenario, Beatrice lives in a fairly peaceful city where society has been divided into factions based on personality and tendencies. A society that is threatened to be broken by conspiracy.

There are some clichés in the story – no book is free of them – such as training and falling in love with basically the first guy she meets (although in the writer’s defense, she doesn’t fall for him right away). However, I don’t like to pick at clichés in stories if the story itself is true and the characters are likable, which they were.

In short, I really enjoyed this book! I was entertained from beginning to end and immediately ordered the other two in the trilogy. I will avoid the other movies for now (which I never saw advertised or talked about; are they relatively unknown?) so nothing is spoiled, but I’m very much looking forward to the rest of Tris’s story. I’m awarding this book four stars out of five, but it’s more like 4.5/5.

4stars

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