3 Stars Pancake in Musashi-Kosugi, Kanagawa

Today I found out that there’s a charming little pancake shop just a short walk from my apartment! It’s funny how you can live somewhere for a while and yet never know something exists until it’s introduced to you. 3 Stars Pancake is a ten- or fifteen-minute walk from Musashi-Kosugi Station, a little farther on from GrandTree, the nearby department store.

Since we arrived on a Sunday, it was insanely crowded. It took a while for the six of us to squash our way in; from the outside, it had looked bigger, but there were just a couple of tables.

It had the simultaneous feel of a chilled out European café and a trendy American lunch spot. It had a really nice, relaxed vibe which contradicted the long line of customers waiting outside.

3 Stars Pancake serves, as you might be able to guess, pancakes. I ordered the February special: chocolate, chocolate, and more chocolate. They’ll stop selling it after the end of this month, and the theme likely stems from Valentine’s Day, where women buy chocolates for the men in their lives.

It was monstrous!

The strawberries and the sharp, tangy berry flavoring in the ice cream granted respite from the potentially overpowering chocolate in the pancakes and cream. I couldn’t finish it by myself. This chocolatey delight is more than enough for one and would probably be able to satisfy two people (that being said, my twelve-year-old student next to me ordered the same thing and demolished it on her own).

Other types of pancakes include a classic-style fluffy type with cream and a fruity delight for those looking for a healthier, lighter dessert.

The drinks were cute, too; cold ones are served in glass jars, American style. From left to right: orange juice, grape juice, ice café latte, ice coffee, and iced tea. My hot café latte (as seen in the featured image) had a cute drawn heart on top of the cream.

The weekend was busy, but going for lunch on a weekday would mean getting in much faster. Certain soft drinks are also free between 10:00am and 2:00pm Monday to Friday.

Important Information

3 Star Pancakes is a cute café, perfect for visiting with friends for a treat. If you order a plate of pancakes and a drink, expect to pay around 2,000 yen. Children and kids are welcome and it’s a non-smoking establishment.

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Traditional and Affordable Japanese Food in the Middle of Nowhere

A group of my students sometimes take me out for lunch. They’re a sweet bunch who love English and like to treat me sometimes. I’m very lucky for that.

Today we took a taxi somewhere in Kanagawa from Mizonokuchi, waited in an elevator, and suddenly came upon this traditional restaurant where the staff members wore kimonos and a scent of soy sauce based cooking filled the air.

We all ordered the special set lunch, which had several delicious courses including a dessert.

1. Sweet Cod, Egg, And Daikon Radish

This was yummy. The fish was sweet, boneless, and easy to eat. The daikon was crunchy and refreshing.

2. Sashimi

Next was maguro sashimi (raw fish) with some vegetables and soy sauce for dipping. As a huge fan of maguro (tuna), this was a great bonus! There was just enough to get your appetite going.

3. Tomato Sukiyaki

Sukiyaki is a special hotpot dish. It bubbled on its own mini stove while we are everything else. We took bits out to mix with the half-boiled egg. Sukiyaki isn’t usually served with tomatoes in it but it was delicious.

4. Chawan Mushi

Chawan mushi is sort of like soup but thicker. It has the consistency of soft boiled egg and inside I found a mushroom and a single soy bean!

5. Tempura

We also had tempura, which is deep fried vegetables and prawn. Tempura is a popular dish in Japan and this one, served with sauce and grated radish, did not disappoint.

6. Rice and Soup

There was also miso soup and “Mugi rice” with barley and bits of plum inside, making for a healthier option than just plain white rice. It was an excellent palette cleanser. At the back you can also see “tsukemono” or pickled vegetables.

7. “Azuki” Red Bean Dessert And Green Tea Served with Coffee

We chose coffee as an after-meal drink, and it was served at the same time as the green tea and dessert, which was unusual. As per many Japanese desserts, this sweet bean treat was very sweet so that the bitter taste of the green tea complements it.

I was very full and satisfied afterwards! Can you believe all this food cost just 2000 yen? If you go for dinner, the price will probably double, but going for lunch means you’ll get a real bargain.

(I’m going to check on the restaurant’s name). It’s about a ten-minute walk from Miyamaedaira Station on the Den en Toshi line, which is a bit of a trek if you’re staying in Tokyo. Going here was an inexpensive way to enjoy real Japanese food, so if you find yourself in Kanagawa, give it a try for lunch!

Yakiniku (Korean Barbecue) in Japan

It’s the weekend, and a national holiday on Monday! I’m getting geared up to spend the next three days killing dragons, hunting monsters, and reading books. Not necessarily in that order.

We had yakiniku for dinner, which is the local word for Korean barbecue. You get a grill at your table and order stuff to put on the fire. The meat is all cut thinly so that it cooks after just a minute or so.

Restaurants usually offer a tabehoudai (all-you-can-eat) course, but you generally don’t need it. The tabehoudai was around 3,400 yen but they had a set for two people for just 2,500 yen and it was more than enough.

They also had nomihoudai (all-you-can-drink) set, but you could only get it if you already ordered the tabehoudai. Therefore, we got just one bottle of sake and then ordered soft drinks to make our own mixed drinks. Forbidden? No. Cheeky? Maybe.

The set was ginormous, have a look. Please forgive the vertical shot though; I am not a clever man.

We also got a big bowl of rice, some sausages, and some kimchi, which is spicy Korean cabbage and one of my favourite foods ever. I remember going mental when I saw kimchi featured in an episode of QI.

It’s pretty much a meat lover’s dream. We had grilled kalbi beef and sausages and rice and kimchi and onion and carrot and pumpkin until we were full to burst. I also had juice with too much sake in and left the restaurant a little merry.

If you visit Japan, definitely be sure to try out “yakiniku.” It’s one of the best not-Japanese-but-kind-of-Japanese styles of eating you don’t want to miss 😀