Is This the Best Ramen in Tokyo?

I like ramen. My husband likes it even more. This versatile and delicious noodles in broth dish can come with a variety of soup bases and toppings. It’s the classic drunk man’s food, and there are hundreds of ramen restaurants in any Japanese city.

I’ve eaten a lot of ramen during my five years in Japan. Roppo Ramen in Nagano Prefecture’s Chino City was always good. Kagetsu in Musashi-Kosugi has become our “local” ramen since it’s a short walk from our apartment. But damn, the best I’ve ever had is, and always will be, Ore-Ryu Ramen in Daikanyama, Shibuya.

Tucked in a small street between an American pizza place and a standing takoyaki, Ore-Ryu is a short walk from my husband’s office. Now we’re staying there while our apartment’s water and electricity supply gets fixed after its damage from Typhoon 19, we had the opportunity to eat there again.

It’s just as great as I remember. I’ve never once been disappointed with a dish in Ore-Ryu, whether I’ve ordered a salt or miso base, got chashu pork or soft boiled egg, or decided to order a side of gyoza dumplings or not.

We went there last night during an evening of drinking in Shibuya. Man oh man, Ore-Ryu is the best.

They serve this amazing fried chicken as a side, but like in the dish above, you can get it directly in the soup. These amazing spicy noodles were only around 1,000 yen, a standard price for ramen but very reasonable for this bowl of perfection.

I also got gyoza on the side.

*Happy slurping noises*

If you know a better ramen place in Tokyo, do let me know. I’m a sucker for this amazing dish.

How to Get There

For all ramen lovers, Ore-Ryu is about a ten-minute walk from Daikanyama Station on the Toyoko Line, or around a 20-minute walk from Shibuya Station on the JR Yamanote line and the Den-en-Toshi, Hanzomon, Toyoko, and Fukutoshin Subway lines.

Ore-Ryu is actually a chain, so there are more branches in Tokyo, but I don’t know if those ones are as good. The chef at the Daikanyama branch is a damn culinary genius.

The address is below (I tried to link the Google Maps URL for it, but computer said no).

Oreryu Shio-ramen Daikanyama branch

1-3 Sarugakucho

Shibuya City,

Tokyo

150-0033

https://goo.gl/maps/2D4gDd3bcCxdFj469

Man, my mouth’s watering just thinking about it. Guess who’s going again for lunch?

A Trip to Hokkaido: Cool Weather, Ramen, and Warnings of Bears

I’d never been to Hokkaido, Japan’s northernmost main island, before. My husband Ken organised a two-night stay in Sapporo and a bunch of activities for us to do. Hokkaido is much cooler than the rest of Japan, and its largest city, Sapporo, is home to the annual Snow Festival in February and the nationally popular Sapporo beer.

We went in September, of course, so no snow for us, but at an average of around 21 degrees Celsius every day, it was a gorgeous break from Tokyo’s scorching summer.

We got a free KitKat on the plane!

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What struck me about Hokkaido the most was how friendly the people are! Everyone had a big smile on their faces and went out of their way to help us out. In contrast to Tokyo, where people sort of keep to themselves and blanch at the thought of talking to strangers, I felt welcome in Sapporo.

The First Day

We started with some miso ramen in Chitose Airport, since our flight was in the morning and we arrived at lunchtime. Lucky me, they thought the piece of pork I got was too small so I got one extra!

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We ventured into the city, Ken taking care of everything so I could just stroll and enjoy the sights. Of course, the train station didn’t look much different from Tokyo’s, but in a way that was nice. I felt safe while at the same time exploring a new place.

Our hotel was a business hotel, simple and cute, but in a fantastic location – within walking distance of Sapporo Station and all the fun nightlife things to do there.

In our first day alone, we managed to visit the famous Clock Tower…

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Take a peek at the park and its Autumn Festival… 

And, of course, explore the downtown area. We managed to do an hour and a half of karaoke for only 600 yen each! If you find yourself in Sapporo and want cheap karaoke, it’s called Karaoke Heart Beat.

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The Second Day

On the second day, we took a train up to Otaru and rented a car to Shimomui Kaigan, a pretty cape on Hokkaido’s west coast. Though we bumped into a tour group, it was still quite quiet compared to the madness of Tokyo’s crowds, and we could enjoy the rocky beach comfortably.

Ken’s sharp eyes even spotted a cute little lizard basking on the wooden fence!

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After getting back, we felt we needed to explore more, so we took a side path up a hill and came across a lighthouse. Unfortunately, I don’t know the name of it.

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I liked the lighthouse so much that I decided to draw it!

We wanted to go farther, but the sign was somewhat off-putting…

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After, we went to the Nikka Whisky Factory.

The story of Nikka Whisky is really cute; Masataka Taketsuru visited Scotland to learn about how whisky was made. While living there, he met a shy Scottish girl called Rita who he ultimately married. She joined him in Japan and supported his dream of becoming a whisky producer. She settled into her life in Japan and made friends with the people there. Eventually, they found success in Hokkaido. Their love story is inspiring.

The factory itself also had a lot of information on Scotland, which was wonderfully nostalgic. We got our share of souvenirs from the shop there, too.

The Third Day

Our flight wasn’t until 9:00pm on our last day, so we still had plenty of time to look around before we had to fly back to reality. We visited Hitsujigaoka, or “Sheep Hill,” to find a statue of William Smith Clark, an American professor and colonel in the American Civil War, who coined the phrase “Boys, be ambitious.”

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There was a small Snow Festival museum where we could see past designs for the festival. It’s really amazing that they could make such intricate shapes with just snow. 

After, we went up Mt. Moiwa on a ropeway. Since we didn’t want to pay extra for the nature car, we walked up to the top (only took about ten minutes – well worth going up for free). We even managed to spot a shy little squirrel on the way. There were some nice views on the top and the weather was perfect for light hiking. 

Lastly, we managed to fit in a visit to the Shiroi Koibito Chocolate Factory! Hokkaido is well known for its white chocolate biscuits and it’s a common souvenir to take home.

Though we only arrived an hour before closing time, there was still time to have a look around. The outside area was very pretty, inspired by Willy Wonka’s Chocolate Factory. We got souvenirs, of course, and even managed to see some of the workers producing the famous little biscuits.

We managed to get a LOT done in just three days, and it was a wonderful trip. Maybe one day we’ll be able to visit in the winter and witness the wonder that is the Snow Festival. For now, though, I’m glad we went in summer and enjoyed the comfortable weather.

A Day in “Coedo” Kawagoe, Saitama Prefecture

Just half an hour from Ikebukuro is Kawagoe, a town in Saitama that is affectionately nicknamed “Coedo” or “Little Edo” for its resemblance to the Edo era. Many old buildings and landmarks untouched by war and fire still stand, and it’s a lovely place to visit for a day trip.

Unlike other hotspots like Senso-ji Temple and Kyoto, Kawagoe didn’t have many foreign tourists at all. Saitama, the prefecture just north of Tokyo, is often overlooked by visitors, but I recommend Kawagoe for its peaceful atmosphere.

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Though a bit of a trek from the station, the attractive part of town is worth the walk. The cute buildings and the shouts of stall staff hard at work gave the streets a nostalgic atmosphere.

The Time Bell is a must-see; its chime is one of the 100 Soundscapes of Japan.

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On every street, there was something to do or see, whether it was coffee, ice cream, or traditional toys to take home.

Walking around was thirsty work, so we stopped for a Coedo beer. Right opposite is a unique-looking Starbucks if you prefer coffee.

After exploring, we stopped for some food. My husband managed to bypass all the expensive touristy places and found a charming hole-in-the-wall ramen shop run by a little old lady. She had money all over the wall from visitors from various countries, and she only served one dish: shoyu (soy sauce)-based ramen, a signature type of noodles for this region.

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This delicious and hearty bowl of ramen, plus a small bowl of rice with a little umeboshi plum, came to just 500 yen!

We also went to visit some temples, though I didn’t take any pictures aside from the enormous torii gate.

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If you ever get the chance to visit Kawagoe, please do! It involves some walking, but it’s a really beautiful and peaceful area without the crowds you get at some other places.

Video Games, Music, and Ramen in Tokyo

There’s a ramen restaurant near our house. Because of its location, it’s almost unknown, but it’s really trendy. It’s somewhere between a bar and a restaurant and has a theme that’s sort of a mix between music and surfing.

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This time, the owner got out his old SNES console and asked us if we wanted to have a go. Food and games?? I’d just spent the past nine hours on the PlayStation 4 but nobody needed to know.

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He set it up and we had enormous fun playing Super Mario, Tetris, and Street Fighter 2.

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On top of that, we of course got to eat yummy ramen! I like this place because although there isn’t as much variety as other ramen restaurants, the guy can make killer tonkotsu (pork) ramen.

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We also had some gyoza dumplings and it was yummy. What a nice evening!

If you find yourself in Meguro, definitely give this place a try. It is right next to Kushi-Katsu Tanaka and it’s called Iki. Here’s the location on Google Maps.

Guys I Just Had Ramen That Blew My Mind

Today I was craving ramen, and my boyfriend can never say no to ramen. So we found this place near our house.

It’s called Mame-kin Gyoza and it serves Chinese noodles. They had a spicy hotpot with which you can have gyoza (dumplings), or tsukemen (that you can dip into the hot soup.)

I chose both, naturally. The picture had five little pictures of peppers and wooooo it was spicy indeed.

The hotpot thing had vegetables, pork, shiitake mushrooms, chili peppers, and even some fish ball stuff that you find in oden.

It was super hot and spicy and tasty. I chucked in the cold noodles and gobbled them all up. The gyoza dumplings had also soaked up all that lovely soup.

The waiter put two small bowls down so my boyfriend and I could share but he underestimated my power. I shoved all that in my belly and it was D E L I S H.

If you like ramen, visit Mame-kin Gyoza for yummy spicy tsukemen noodles! ❤️