Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Allegiant” by Veronica Roth

The final in the Divergent series by Veronica Roth is Allegiant, which I bought at the same time as the second in the series. I didn’t think much of Insurgent, but thought I might as well finish the series, especially since I’d already bought the paperback.

AllegiantIn this installment, Tris and Tobias finally leave the city and we find out what’s happening in the world beyond. I found the world to be quite exciting, with a satisfying explanation that opened our characters’ eyes to what was outside their city. We didn’t see as much of the world as I’d have liked, though I enjoyed the irony that the Divergent were feared and even killed in the city, yet were considered better outside.

Each chapter was either from Tris’ or Tobias’ perspective. There wasn’t much difference between their voices, something the author should have worked on more. I sometimes had to go back and check on whose eyes we were seeing the world from, which was a problem that, apparently, a lot of readers struggled with.

Without giving too much away, the ending was really unexpected and I was, unlike some readers, actually really happy with it. Tris was becoming an annoying know-it-all and the ending helped redeem her of that. Although I didn’t feel like we saw enough of the world (despite this being a 600-page book), I was eager to see the conclusion of this adventure and I certainly thought it was better than the second installment.

I’m not sure if I’ll read the books again and I don’t care enough about them to sit and watch the movies. I watched Divergent on Netflix, which is how I discovered the story, but switched off Insurgent a few minutes in, mostly because I hadn’t enjoyed the book that much. With all this in mind, as well as the redeeming ending and easy-to-read narrative, I give Allegiant three stars out of five.

3stars

Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Insurgent” by Veronica Roth

Following the enjoyable dystopian YA novel Divergent, I picked up the second of the trilogy. Things were getting exciting, and I had high hopes for what Tris and her love interest were going to do next now their world had fallen apart.

insurgent“As war surges in the factions of dystopian Chicago all around her, Tris attempts to save those she loves—and herself—while grappling with haunting questions of grief and forgiveness, identity and loyalty, politics and love.”

I actually found the second book to be a bit disappointing. I thought the first book was great; although sometimes dripping with YA cliches (such as falling for the first handsome guy she meets), I thought the world was original and I enjoy exploring the factions.

I lost interest about halfway through because Tris started to become really annoying. She was increasingly reckless, and I was glad Tobias caught on this as well, so it suggests that the writer was aware of this character flaw. “Playing the hero” all the time could have been forgiven, except when she did it again, she lied to her boyfriend… again, even though he worried so much about her and almost got himself killed trying to save her the last time.

The story circled several times in the first half of the book. They think they’re safe, until they’re attacked and have to run. They find a new place to hide, get attacked, and have to run. It only got interesting about 60% of the way through. The novelty of exploring this dystopian world had worn off by now, and there wasn’t much more to discover. They didn’t see anything new, only the same city and the train and buildings. Arguably the Amity headquarters was new, but it wasn’t that interesting.

Characters were also tough to keep track of. Jeanine, Tori, Tobias, Marcus, and Tris were easy enough, but other characters seemed to sort of blend together. I needed reminding when names like Edward, Lynn, and Shauna came up, and ended up remembering Edward for his eyepatch and Lynn for her shaved head rather than any defining personality traits.

This book wasn’t horrible, by any means. I wanted to know the all-important “truth” that became the main focus of the second half of the story, which drove me to keep reading. I was prepared for some mind-blowing news that “changed everything,” as the writer said. The information was… meh. It kind of annoys me this has 44,000 reviews on Amazon and three movies, yet no one really talks about it.

I’ve already bought the last in the series, Allegiant, so it might wrap up the story nicely and develop Tris’ character a bit. I hope to see an awesome final installment. I’ll let you guys know if it’s worth it!

I give this book in the Divergent series two stars out of five.

2stars

Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Divergent” by Veronica Roth

Netflix is a goldmine of great movies, as many of us know. I watched a dystopian science-fiction movie called Divergent and within about five minutes, I just knew it was a novel first. The way the world was introduced and the sixteen-year-old character was a dead giveaway. I enjoyed the movie, and immediately ordered the book.

divergent

“One choice can transform you. Beatrice Prior’s society is divided into five factions—Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent).

Beatrice must choose between staying with her Abnegation family and transferring factions. Her choice will shock her community and herself. But the newly christened Tris also has a secret, one she’s determined to keep hidden, because in this world, what makes you different makes you dangerous.”

I jumped right into this compelling YA! We see the story from the eyes of Beatrice – or Tris, as she’s later called – and we see her faults as well as her strengths, which was refreshing. She talks about her faults without needlessly putting herself down. She knows she is brave, but also knows that she is too selfish for her parents’ faction, and is very likable.

I try not to compare movies with their books (The Vampire’s Assistant, a crappy film based on an incredible horror series, was torturous enough), but I much preferred the book to the movie. More of what Tris did and said made sense, as most of the logic happened in her head and was difficult to portray on screen.

The world was original. It was set at some point in the future in a city, presumably in the United States, after a war has torn the world apart. Instead of the overused post-apocalyptic scenario, Beatrice lives in a fairly peaceful city where society has been divided into factions based on personality and tendencies. A society that is threatened to be broken by conspiracy.

There are some clichés in the story – no book is free of them – such as training and falling in love with basically the first guy she meets (although in the writer’s defense, she doesn’t fall for him right away). However, I don’t like to pick at clichés in stories if the story itself is true and the characters are likable, which they were.

In short, I really enjoyed this book! I was entertained from beginning to end and immediately ordered the other two in the trilogy. I will avoid the other movies for now (which I never saw advertised or talked about; are they relatively unknown?) so nothing is spoiled, but I’m very much looking forward to the rest of Tris’s story. I’m awarding this book four stars out of five, but it’s more like 4.5/5.

4stars

Get Divergent on Amazon US
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