Valentine’s Day JUST Ended And We’re Already Seeing This

It never stops with special events and festival goods spurring businesses to launch the latest and greatest relevantly-themed product.

Valentine’s Day in Japan involves women giving their loved ones and male coworkers chocolates. As you might expect, sales of this sugary treat skyrocket around late January and early February. I did my own share of choccy shopping and am eagerly awaiting reciprocal gifts on White Day.

That being said, Valentine’s Day JUST ended, and already I came across THIS.

Sakura season is ages away! New Year’s Eve was just five minutes ago… wasn’t it?

Trust Starbucks to get ahead with cherry blossom themed drinks.

Buying branded coffee in convenience stores is way cheaper than going to the cafes themselves, and I picked this up for around 170 yen (closer to 600 in an actual Starbucks). I just had to grab this early treat to celebrate the yearly blossom of pink and white flowers millions across the country will enjoy and celebrate in March.

Chocolate and strawberry jelly; what could go wrong?

Verdict: it was revolting.

Book Review: “The Rats” (The Rats Trilogy Book 1) by James Herbert

I am all about horror at the moment!

After finishing Nobody True, my mum recommended I read The Rats, James Herbert’s debut novel. I had a faint memory of my dad saying he’d read it and it had “scared the crap” out of him. And my dad’s a big man who doesn’t scare easily.

I bought The Rats. As you might imagine, it’s about rats. The original cover just screams ’70s, don’t you think?

*Note: this review contains minor spoilers.

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“It was only when the bones of the first devoured victims were discovered that the true nature and power of these swarming black creatures with their razor sharp teeth and the taste for human blood began to be realized by a panic-stricken city.

For millions of years man and rats had been natural enemies. But now for the first time – suddenly, shockingly, horribly – the balance of power had shifted . . .”

Imagine any horror film. Most likely the opening scene is some unlucky sod getting mauled/attacked/sliced apart as a spooky introduction to the antagonist. The Rats starts out in much the same way, except, unlike a movie, we learned a bit about the character before they met their unfortunate fate.

I actually really liked this. We were given tidbits, a run-through of the person’s life, even if that was the last time we would ever “see” them alive. Some might argue this is pointless – why would you care about their lives, hopes, and past mistakes that led them to their untimely death?

I realized that it’s because of their past lives that they ended up getting killed in such a horrible way. Take Henry, the vagrant at the very beginning of the story. Perhaps if it wasn’t for his office affair that led to defamation, resignation, and eventually crippling loneliness that took him from successful businessman to alcoholic vagabond, he wouldn’t have slept in the abandoned house where the first of the killer rats attacked.

Take Dave, the teenager who was on his way home to catch the last train after messing around with his girlfriend. Maybe if he’d gotten an earlier train, stayed over at her house, or not met up with her that night at all (not necessarily a mistake, but an unfortunate coincidence), he wouldn’t have ventured into the station from which came the inevitable attack.

The mother who left her one-year-old alone to nip next door to borrow some tea (yes, it’s a British book) may not have perished along with her baby if only she’d taken her daughter with her. George the zookeeper ended up getting mauled by one of his beloved animals after he foolishly let it out of its cage instead of saving himself.

Harris is the main character of this story, and I liked him a lot. He’s brave, though he doesn’t try to play the hero; he’s a school teacher, a normal bloke with common sense but who wants to help out the area where he grew up, first in his career and then with the infestation. The rats themselves are really scary; they’re well-described, absolutely vicious, and Herbert did a great job of portraying the situations where you knew that as soon as one rat showed up, you knew the victim would be overwhelmed within moments.

Harris and the police struggle to beat back the terrifying rat infestation. These fearless creatures are getting bolder by the day, and it’s only a matter of time before the whole city is taken down. The amount of action and sense of urgency kept the pages turning.

The Rats was published in 1974, whereas Nobody True was released in 2003. The Rats is not badly written by any means, but I could see how Herbert’s writing style developed from his debut to the later novel, which ran much more smoothly. Writers never cease to improve if they constantly work on their craft, and part of me wishes I’d read The Rats first as, compared to Nobody True, some of the prose was quite clunky. There were also several typos in the Kindle edition, which surprised me.

These didn’t ruin my experience, though, and it shouldn’t deter you from reading it, either. The Rats is a classic novel every horror fan should pick up and I give it four stars out of five. I’ll definitely be buying the next one, Lair.

4stars

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Nobody True” by James Herbert

I enjoy reading now, but I read a lot more as a child. My mother has probably gobbled up even more novels than I have; when I was growing up, she’d have stacks and stacks of books, shelves stuffed of volumes, rooms packed with tomes, tables groaning under paperbacks. Before the days of the Kindle, her collection looked even more impressive.

There was a book I’d read part of when I was a kid, around twelve or thirteen years old. I’d always remembered the story, and when she came to visit I described the plot. Like the genius she is, she rattled off the author’s name at once and we found it: Nobody True! I remembered the cover and also remembered I’d read half of it. I don’t know why I stopped reading; looking back, the theme was probably too mature for me at the time.

There were many things about the book I’d forgotten, but the hook is a winner: what if you astral travelled, gained control of out-of-body experiences, even using this skill to explore the world around you without limits? And what if, one night during a business trip, you came back and you had been killed? Not only murdered, but brutally so: hacked, mutilated, your body completely destroyed?

The hook stayed with me, and it’s for that purpose I sought out the novel again.

4e6612c40a39f602e4dba518684016ee“What happens when you lose your body?

Jim True knows. He has returned from an out-of-body experience to find he has been brutally murdered and his body mutilated. No one can see him, no one can hear him, no one, except his killer, knows he still exists. Freed from his body, True embarks on a quest to find his killer and discover why and how he has managed to survive.

As he closes in on his murderer, True discovers that even the very people he loved and trusted have betrayed him. He meets his killer, a strange and sinister figure who can also leave his body at will.

In James Herbert’s Nobody True, an epic and deadly battle ensues between True and a seemingly unstoppable and hideous serial killer – a man now intent on even more murders, including True’s wife and child.”

Contrary to many of the books I review, this novel is relatively old; Nobody True was published in 2003 by Pan Macmillan. Herbert himself died in 2013, but I enjoyed this book so much I felt compelled to write this review.

Herbert’s writing style is witty, snappy, and engaging, which drew me in from the very first line, although the main character (the book is written in first person) tends to go off on tangents a bit (something the MC, Jim True, acknowledges). There is a lot of speculation on actual astral travelling, and the book is written as though the event actually happened, a trait I love in any genre of book and something that also appears in The Saga of Darren Shan, which is also, interestingly, a horror.

The plot was full of twists and turns, some of which I expected, other ones I didn’t. I found one of the twists at the end was mildly interesting but unimportant in the grand scheme of things, but that didn’t mar my enjoyment; in fact, it made me want to read the book again to look out for clues for said twist.

There were parts of this book that terrified me; at many points I was holding the phone (I was using the Kindle app; it’s costly to send paperbacks to Japan) an inch or so from my face, with what I imagine is a wide-eyed expression when I was reading on the train and whatnot. The only book that has scared me more is Gerald’s Game by Stephen King, though it was close. I think I actually enjoyed Nobody True more as a whole.

There are several people in the story you might consider to be antagonists, though undoubtedly the main one is the serial killer, a monster both inside and out. Suffering a facial deformity from birth, bitterness, jealousy, and insanity have twisted this killer into a merciless, horrifying mess. This serial killer was truly terrifying, described with flair.

As well as an exciting horror story, there was even a nice sentiment or lesson to be learned from the book as a whole. Though it had been a brutal story, it left a pleasant feeling at the end, a message that is relevant to everyone. I’ll let you find that one out for yourself, though.

My only issue with the book is that we don’t find out what happens to one of the characters, and though this can easily be explained away by the book’s message, I was still waiting for an explanation as to what happened to them. Nevertheless, Nobody True was fantastic and I’m really glad I remembered it and sought it out. My mum has introduced me to some great works and I doubt this one will be the last. I give this book five stars!

5stars

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Reavers of the Tempest” by J.M.D. Reid

Not gonna lie; I love matte covers.

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Following Above the Storm is the second installment of J.M.D. Reid’s The Storm Below series, a five-segment fantasy telling the story of a world above an ever-churning blanket of clouds and lightning. The Storm was conjured to rise the lands of the faithful, and now races live in (relative) peace in the sun, leaving the doomed, named the Stormriders for the deadly Cyclones they wield, in darkness.

What more could there be to worry about besides the dangers of the Navy, including gigantic tornadoes hell-bent on destroying everything one loves, as well as the tormented ramblings of a chained, tortured goddess? Oh, right. . . a jealous friend, a frustrated assassin, and a pocketful of plague.

reavers-ebook_reid-1800x1200“Pirates rampage across the skies!

Ary, Chaylene, and the crew of the skyship Dauntless are called into action again! The Bluefin Raiders pillage and burn, but the greatest threat lurks aboard the ship…

Vel plots murder.

Wanting Chaylene for himself, he waits for his chance to poison Ary. Only it’s not poison he carries…

It’s a plague.”

The story continues to focus on Ary, Chaylene, and poor, foolish Vel’s love triangle. However, this is just one of the many plots of the story. Reavers of the Tempest is a military fantasy through and through.

Though the dangers of Cyclones remain, our young characters are called to action to fight against the Bluefin Raiders, vicious pirates who pillage the skies, murder, and steal ships and their cargo. In the shadows, Vel plots murder, blinded by infatuation for Chaylene and encouraged by an assassin.

More of the world and the truth behind its history are revealed in The Storm Below‘s second installment, leaving readers hungry for more. Ary is plagued by dreams and visions of a trapped goddess and discovers there is more to him being Stormtouched than being condemned by the Church, something that might even help them…

What really made this book for me was the exciting finale. Ary’s discovery of his newfound power, the struggle against the pirates, and the consequences of Vel’s actions all tie nicely together for a powerful installment of this series.

I’m thoroughly enjoying The Storm Below. It’s not a world I’ll be able to forget easily and though the cast of characters grows with each book, they are real and distinct enough where I don’t get confused (with the main characters, at least). I give Reavers of the Tempest four stars!

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Above the Storm” by J.M.D. Reid

It arrived!

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I’d already read the ebook, but I decided to get a paperback of J.M.D. Reid’s debut novel, Above the Storm. It’s the first in a five-piece series called The Storm Below telling the intricate story of a floating world above an endless, churning storm – a unique world you’ll have a hard time forgetting.

I’ve been a fan of J.M.D. Reid ever since I came across his short story, The Assassin’s Remorse. Captivated by Reid’s world-building, I was an instant fan. He’s been talking about his The Storm Below series for years; no doubt such an enormous, detailed universe with its own rules, characters and, of course, the story itself, has taken years of this talented author’s time and energy. Above the Storm dropped in October 2018.

50414323_1199432536879361_3773116747922538496_n“To save the world, Ary must die!

Ary, a young man scarred by his past, is thrust into the dangers of the military. But he carries a deadly secret: the dark goddess’s touch stains his soul. 

Her taint threatens to destroy all he loves.

He must hide the truth from the other marines and the woman he loves. Can Ary survive the dangers of service and the zealous assassin plotting his death?

Are you ready for the action, danger, romance, and betrayal exploding across the skies Above the Storm!”

I wasn’t new to Reid’s Above the Storm world when I first delved into this novel, having already read same-world shorts such as Plight of the Arshion and The Captain’s Mad Plan. The ever-swirling Storm separates the good, Riasruo-worshipping races from the Wrackthar, those left below after the war two centuries earlier. Those below, nicknamed the Stormriders, send vicious Cyclones to attack those they envy above, and the military protects its citizens from destruction.

When they come of age, every citizen of the Autonomy and the Empire receive Blessings from the sun goddess, Riasruo, in one of three levels: Lightning, Pressure, Wind, and Mist, on the Summer Solstice of their seventeenth year. Ary and his two best friends, Chaylene and Vel, all receive their Blessings and Ary hopes to marry Chaylene and work as a farmer in their hometown, Vesche.

During Ary’s childhood when a Cyclone attacked his town, he foolishly stayed behind to watch, enthralled by the action. Struck by lightning during the battle and therefore touched by Theisseg, Riasruo’s unholy sister, Ary dreams of the trapped Storm Goddess and is tormented by her pain.

Drafted into the military, Ary and Chaylene marry to stay together before they must face four years of naval duty and to join the good fight against the Cyclone-wielding Stormriders. With Vel jealous of their relationship, the pressures of duty, vicious rumors about Chaylene’s fidelity, the ever-churning dangers of those from beneath the Storm, and whispers of an assassin in Ary’s midst, Reid’s debut novel is a fantasy adventure that you’ll find impossible to forget.

I’ve always liked Reid’s writing style; it flows well, activates your imagination, and impresses with originality. Above the Storm is fantasy, certainly, though it is a romance secondly, focusing on the love triangle between Ary, Chaylene, and Vel. My favorite characters are Zori, a fiercely loyal and fun-loving girl who joined the Navy to escape a life of prostitution, and Estan, a Vaarckthian scholar with an inquisitive mind who fell out with his wealthy family when his thirst for knowledge questioned the teachings of the Church.

Not all is as it seems in Above the Storm; in fact, the first novel barely scratches the surface of the real, horrific truths. I was thirsting for more when I finished this book, to follow the several storylines and find the answers to the questions I had.

I give Above the Storm five stars!

5stars

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Visit J.M.D. Reid’s blog

Book Review: “Caitlyn (Book Two) A Stain on the Soul” by Elizabeth Davies

After thoroughly enjoying the refreshingly well-written Caitlyn (Book One) Three Bloody Pieces by Elizabeth Davies, I eagerly jumped into the next one. I really admire Davies’ writing skill; every sentence sings, making it a smooth and brilliantly fun journey.

*This article contains minor spoilers

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“Resigned to another lifetime of being a witch’s familiar, Caitlyn has found a degree of peace in her role as the Duke of Normandy’s protector and spy.

But that peace is shattered when she returns to her native land only to come face-to-face with her past, and fall in love with a man who she desperately hopes will become her future.”

Caitlyn has been bound to Arlette for years and feels like a mother to Arlette’s son, William, who covets the English crown. I was excited when I realised that this character is actually the real William the Conqueror! Elizabeth Davies has cleverly woven real events with the magical, providing explanations that work for real-life events.

I continue to admire and sympathise with Caitlyn as she is forced to stay with her mistress and help her get her son on the throne by committing vile acts she doesn’t want to do. At first, I was taken aback by the fact that so many years had gone by; Caitlyn never got revenge for the attack on her kingdom and was never known to be of royal blood over those decades. This wasn’t a typical story of getting’s one justice and living happily ever after; Caitlyn did what she does best and just got on with things, keeping her chin up, through a life she never could have foreseen.

I liked this book a lot. Davies’ skillful writing makes the story twist and turn in ways you don’t expect. I admit I wasn’t completely sold on her falling in love so easily; it seemed she locked eyes with a handsome stranger, tumbled with him a few times, and then they were suddenly madly in love with each other, all for it to be for nothing when William made his excuses for her to leave. I am also not a fan of detailed sex scenes (though this is personal preference). It’s for these reasons I give the book four stars.

Even though I wasn’t sure about some parts of the story midway, the book did not falter. Caitlyn was sensible with her relationship, accepting that it couldn’t ever turn into anything more serious because of the magic hold on her. When you finally think that she is free of the witch controlling her life and her being, the story comes to a thrilling finish with a twist I didn’t see coming. I’m very thirsty for the next story, so keep your eyes peeled for a review of the final installment of this awesome trilogy!

4stars

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Shonan No Hoseki Illuminations Event in Enoshima, Japan

Enoshima is a gorgeous island near Kamakura where people go to take a break from the city, see some local shrines, and spend the day with their families. Right now in December, there is a lovely illumination event in Samuel Cocking Garden near Enoshima Shrine.

It cost 200 yen to inside and an extra 300 yen to go up the tower. The lights were impressive, and stepping into the area felt like walking into a new world.

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Illumination events appear all over the cities in Japan around December and January. Though not always festive, they are a public version of Christmas lights that people can enjoy this time of year.

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They certainly pushed the boat out at this garden. Together with the walk past the breathtaking Enoshima Shrine and with a nearby cafe selling french toast, coffee, and other goodies, it was a lovely evening out with friends.

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If you’d like to see this illumination, the event will run until February 17th, 2019. For more information about opening times, see the website below.

Illumination Event website
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A Hidden Gem in Kanagawa: Tamagawa Daishi Temple

Back in my tour guide days, I used to dread hearing the words “hidden gem.” Tourists claim to want to see unknown places that no one knows about, but if tourists went there, they wouldn’t be hidden. I know some of the popular places in Tokyo, but I wasn’t aware of many places that “no one knows about.”

However, today a friend took me to a temple in Futago-Tamagawa. Futago-Tamagawa, much like other places in Kanagawa Prefecture, has undergone a lot of development in recent years. Young people often visit for shopping and dining. But there is more to the area than department stores and restaurants.

After walking for around fifteen minutes after a delicious Korean lunch near the station, we reached a small temple called Tamagawa Daishi. Now, it didn’t look like much from the outside…

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But what made this very old temple special was that it was much, much bigger once you ventured underground.

Unfortunately, we weren’t allowed to take pictures on the inside, but here is an account of what we found.

After offering a five-yen coin, ringing the gong, and saying a quick prayer, we ventured inside. The temple was stuffed full of old treasures: ancient gongs, statues of various Buddhist gods blackened by time, and solid gold bells and things I didn’t recognise. Incense burned and the smell of wood filled the air.

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It cost 100 yen to go down into the underground. We signed our names, put on the provided slippers, and headed down there.

“Last time I was here, we got into trouble for screaming,” my friend told me. “The monk had to tell us off.”

Apparently, it was so dark down there they got freaked out and started shrieking. She wasn’t kidding; it was pitch-black and we had to walk slowly, hands sliding along the wall. I’m not sure what the point of a dark tunnel in a Japanese temple is, but it might give you the feeling of walking into another world.

After several minutes of feeling our way along in the dark, we reached this amazing underground room. Again, taking photographs was prohibited and I wasn’t about to disrespect the rules, but there was a long corridor full of the 88 monks of the temple from back then. Some of them had unlit candles or other treasures placed before them.

There were also statues of angels, one enormous stone statue of the monk who built the temple, and various models of the gods of fire. At one point, we came across a god who helped take unborn deceased children to the afterlife. A month ago I had a miscarriage, but instead of being upsetting, the statue of a god with smaller cherubs clinging to his robes filled me with wonder (though I did feel my eyes burning.)

My friend said later that she had forgotten about my misfortune when she had invited me, and apologised profusely. I told her it was fine; I had wanted to visit a temple with these statues anyway, so in a way, it was beautiful, if a little heartbreaking.

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Fortunately, we were allowed to take pictures outside.

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Then we headed to Musashi-Nakahara to see a small farm of pansies. The pansy is the symbol of Nakahara Ward and is popular to buy around December. Some of the arrangements in the picture below were being sold for 30,000 yen (About £206 GBP or $265 USD)!

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All in all, it was a great day and very different from what I usually do. If you’re in the area, Tamagawa Daishi is worth a visit for the vast array of authentic treasures that are hundreds of years old. It’s a little surreal to be in an underground temple surrounded by priceless artifacts from temple worship.

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Caitlyn (Book One) Three Bloody Pieces” by Elizabeth Davies

Although I adore new worlds borne from the imagination of fantasy writers – they push the boundaries of their fictional universe, creating a new history, races, and cultures that we can explore and discover – I also have a soft spot for historical fiction. Exploring the story of characters that live in the real world gives them a sense of wonder and magic. If I read a story that is set in our world a few hundred years ago, we know that our ancestors lived in a similar world, facing the challenges and obstacles the character does.

I recently came across a historical fantasy called Three Bloody Pieces. It is the first of the Caitlyn trilogy, written by Welsh paranormal author Elizabeth Davies. Always eager for something new to read, I delved straight into this novel after enjoying the free sample.

Three_3bloodypieces_e_Cover“A dead king, a queen who is more than she seems, and a witch who uses the dark arts to entrap her. Queen, widow, beggar – Lady Caitlyn is all three, and now she can add murderer to the list. When death and treachery propels her south to Normandy, to seek sanctuary with the exiled Prince Alfred, visions of a woman with ancient eyes travel with her. Herleva is a woman filled with ambition and greed. A woman who intends to be more than a commoner. A woman who gets what she wants by whatever means possible, even if she has to practice the dark arts to achieve her goals. A woman who is a witch. Caitlyn finds herself caught up in a magic which changes her very being. A magic which produces a king to change the lives of every man, woman, and child in England.”

Davies’ writing style was authentic and vivid. I followed the story at her comfortable pace, finding it easy to imagine the scenes around me. Sometimes you come across books that focus so much on the description that they lose you on the way. This didn’t happen with Three Bloody Pieces. There was enough description to conjure images of the characters and surroundings without overwhelming us with unneeded “fluff.”

We are thrown into the action from the very first page. Lady Caitlyn has lost everything: her kingdom, her husband, and the victory she’d expected in their battle. Her husband is lying dead at her feet, the approach of enemy soldiers heavy on her shoulders. With barely enough time to bury King Rhain before they have to flee, Caitlyn must set her grief aside and focus on survival. A queen by birth and also by marriage, she is in danger from her husband’s enemies and forced to leave her unfortunate people behind to fend for themselves.

This novel kept me on my toes. Every time I thought I’d be able to guess what was coming, the story went in an entirely new direction. This gave it an incredible lack of predictability which, to me, is very important.

I also really liked Caitlyn’s character. She was brave and could get on with things even when a weaker person would have crumbled. I suppose that by entering an arranged marriage at a young age, she had accepted what fate had in store for her and had even grown to care for her husband; this situation must have prepared her for a life of adapting to her situation even if it were terrible. Caitlyn was certainly pushed to her limit several times, but she never despaired.

The first part of the novel was like a gritty fantasy adventure. Caitlyn was getting strange visions of a terrifying, unknown woman who cut up dead bodies and performed strange rituals with them. Caitlyn and her temporary protectors fled from her homeland in Wales and to a nearby lord who might be able to help her.

I was slightly disappointed that there wasn’t more of a build-up between two very important scenes, but that might be personal preference. The overall mood of the book changed halfway through with a strange twist. If you’ll look at the other reviews on Amazon, you’ll see I’m not alone in thinking this twist was a little weird. I actually almost stopped reading, but I was invested in Caitlyn’s life and was curious as to what would happen next.

As well as being brave and adapting to her unfortunate new lifestyle, Caitlyn remained an empathetic, caring person. She also had a great amount of sass that had me laughing aloud sometimes. This added realism to her character – she wasn’t just a noble queen with a brave attitude, but quite down-to-earth, relatable, and funny with her sarcasm and comebacks, especially the ones she thought to herself as she held her tongue. We’ve all done that before! I can’t list most of my favourite quotes without giving away spoilers, but one of the funniest was “She looked as though the last contact she’d had with water was at her own Christening.”

Even though the aforementioned twist was hard to swallow, the book redeemed itself. I watched Caitlyn and the challenges she had to face, some keeping me at the edge of my seat. Three Bloody Pieces was so charming and well-written that I couldn’t help but buy the others of the trilogy right away. I won’t be forgetting this story in a hurry and I’m eager to read the next.

I want to give Three Bloody Pieces four and a half stars, but unfortunately, that’s not possible. Therefore, I’ll be giving it four stars on this blog and five stars on Amazon and Goodreads.

4stars

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8 Tips For Making a Daily To-Do List That Will Change Your Life

We’ve all been there: you have a list of things to do in your head, but really all you want to do is play video games/nap/see your friends/curl up on the couch with a book. “I’ll do it later,” you think, and suddenly it’s 10pm, the day is over, and you’re left with nothing to show for your day except guilt and regret.

Hashtag relatable, amirite?

I was like that, too. On my days off, I would promise myself I’d get to writing or planning out my next novel, only to spend the next seven hours playing Dragon Age or Horizon Zero Dawn. Although I love games and it’s completely fine to spend your day gaming every now and then, it started to become a bad habit, and the deeper you are into a bad habit, the harder it is to get yourself out.

When we moved to Musashi-Kosugi, it felt like a fresh start in a fresh new apartment. However, I don’t believe that moving somewhere new really got me organised. What did sort me out was something ancient and extremely simple, yet more effective than I ever could have imagined: the to-do list.

Do it. Do it right now. Open Google Docs in another tab. Label it with tomorrow’s date (or today’s date if it’s still early while you’re reading this) and write a list of things you need to do. Done right, it can help you be more productive than you could ever have guessed.

Here are some tips on your to-do list and how to stick to it.

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1. Make it Realistic

There’s no use sticking eight hours’ worth of solid work onto your list. Start off slow – maybe add one or two things such as “pick up the children from school” and “write 500 words of new book.” Even things you were planning to do anyway should be on there.

Adding too much to your list can just make you feel more overwhelmed than ever, and you’ll end up getting none of it done at all.

2. Add Easy Things for Momentum

I always start my to-do list with two things: “make coffee” and “kiss my husband.” Both of these things are easy and part of my morning routine. When you already have two items on your list ticked, it’s much easier to get started on the next. At the time of writing this article, I’ve already finished the first two things, getting me mentally ready for the third (which was writing this).

3. Prioritise

You might have an enormous amount of things to do: housework, personal projects, freelance projects, things you simply can’t put off, and things you could probably put off for another week. Think about what needs to be done now.

For instance, do you have a paper that has a deadline? Get that done before working on your personal project.

4. Start Early

On days where I’m not working at my day job, I try to start the things on the list at or before 9:00am. That way, by lunchtime I have already finished three or four things on the list.

Starting early, when possible, also gives you the evening to do whatever you want, completely guilt-free. You’ll feel much better when you’ve had a productive day. You may even feel motivated to do more work, but be sure to take a rest, too. Playing Dying Light in the evening is way more enjoyable after a day of getting stuff done.

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5. Be Specific

Adding things like “work on new book” or “practise guitar” is all well and good, but be sure to have concrete goals. Add exactly what you want to get done that day. For example, when working on a proofreading project, I’ll aim to edit 25 pages as one task, which will usually take an hour or so. That way, when the 25 pages are up, the task is ‘finished’ and I can rest for a bit.

Some people may rather put time instead of tasks (for example, “proofread for one hour”), but I personally think tasks are more important. You can easily get distracted by your phone, making tea, or whatever else, and the hour can waste away rather than being a time slot of solid work.

6. Allow Time to Rest… But Not Too Much

Allow small breaks, but stick to them. If a break is fifteen minutes, make it fifteen minutes. You may find your motivation is high after completing tasks on your list, though, so feel free to power through if you want to! I’ve found that ticking tasks from my lists just makes me feel more motivated to start with the next one.

Never feel guilty for taking a break, though. Sometimes your mind needs a short break to refuel. Just be sure that your break doesn’t accidentally turn into three hours of nothing.

7. Add Variety

Dedicating a day to your main hobby, task, or skill development is all well and good, but you’re going to burn out quickly if you just have “work on thesis for eight hours” on your list. Here is a quick example list for a student working on her dissertation.

  • Have breakfast
  • Take a shower and get dressed
  • Write 300 words of dissertation
  • Vacuum room
  • Plan second half of essay
  • Call Mum
  • Email lecturer about deadline

etc, etc, etc.

Breaking up your list into various kinds of bitesize tasks makes it a lot less overwhelming. You also get a lot more done in your day. It’s surprising how much can be achieved in less than twelve hours.

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8. Make Your List the Night Before

Don’t wait until morning to make the list for that day! Before you go to bed, make a clear, easy-to-follow list for the following day, complete with easy tasks like eating meals and showering. That way, when you wake up, you can get started with task 1 with a clear mind.

You may be surprised at how much you can get done with a simple to-do list. In the time I’ve been making a daily list, I’ve completed writing assignments that I’d kept putting off, planned out previously difficult details of a book I’m writing, and proofread a huge chunk of a novel for a client. I don’t think I’ll ever go back to a list-less life, and you shouldn’t, either.

So what are you waiting for? I want to see your to-do list for tomorrow! Get cracking!