About Poppy

Proofreader and fantasy writer. Living in Tokyo with my husband and dreaming about owning a dog.

Book Review: “Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption” by Stephen King

Movie buffs, Morgan Freeman fans, or anyone with good taste in film has seen or at least heard of the 1994 masterpiece The Shawshank Redemption starring Tim Robbins and Morgan Freeman. Of course, it was a novella first, written by the American master of horror, Stephen King.

I recently received a paperback named Different Seasons as a belated wedding gift containing four of King’s novellas, one of which is the 129-page Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption, which would inspire the classic movie released twelve years after the story’s publication.

91h9ji0d2KL._RI_Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption is the story of two men convicted of murder – one guilty, one innocent – who form the perfect partnership as they dream up a scheme to escape from prison.”

It isn’t a horror, though arguably the true “horrors” of prison life, such as “solitary” conditions, bribery, rape, are discussed. Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption is a tale about perseverance, patience, and hope. It’s about holding onto what’s right and staying strong even in the toughest of times.

The book is just a novella, and a lot was added to make it into a movie. It’s not the only of King’s stories to be adapted in this way; more examples include The Mist and 1408 (which, incidentally, are both horrors).

It’s written from Red’s point of view, and though the story is about Andy and his time at the prison of Shawshank, we find out a lot about how Red observes, thinks, and feels. Interestingly, Red was a white man in the book (described as having greying red hair), but Morgan Freeman was perfect for the role in the movie adaptation.

Red is the person who can get things for you. In prison, he’s an important man who’s approached when someone needs things like alcohol, a pack of cards, or a dirty book. His friendship with Andy begins when the younger inmate asks him to get a poster of Rita Hayworth to put in his cell.

Andy shows up at Shawshank for killing his wife and her lover, and appears mild-mannered, calm, and even casual; he strolls about as though he’s at ease with the world and his words are carefully chosen. After advising a guard on how to keep his inheritance without it being taxed, Andy, who had been a banker before his stretch in prison, starts helping the other guards with his finances and, in turn, gets to live alone in his cell and is protected from the Sisters, a vicious gang of rapists.

You might know the rest of the story, and if you haven’t, I won’t give it all away.

Red tells the story in an order that isn’t chronological, often jumping back and forth between the years to talk about events and people. Much of it is also skimmed over, told rather than shown, which I thought would be against the number one rule in writing. Though it wasn’t completely confusing, it was jarring at times to go from the early ’70s back to 1959, but since I knew the story it wasn’t completely baffling. I did think, though, that I would have preferred to be shown through certain events rather than them being mentioned off-hand as something leading up to the “present.”

The movie also improved on many things. If you haven’t seen the film or read the book, stop reading now. If you don’t care about spoilers or you know the tale, read on.

**WARNING: SPOILERS AHEAD!**

There are some vast differences between Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption and its movie adaptation. Here are a few examples.

  • In the movie, the leader of the Sisters is beaten to within an inch of his life for his treatment of Andy. In the book, they fade into the background when Andy is given protection.
  • Tommy, the young man who met the real killer of Andy’s wife, is transferred to a minimum-security prison, a sort of bribe by the Warden to get him out of the way. In the film, he’s shot dead by a guard; it’s an evil and shocking twist, though the concept of Andy’s only hope willingly leaving him behind is sadder and, in a way, darker.
  • Red doesn’t officially find Andy in the book. It ends with him out of prison and receiving the hidden letter he found after following his best friend’s clues and clinging to the hope that he may track him down someday. Movie watchers enjoy happy endings, and the on-screen story had a much more feel-good ending. Whether that means it’s better is debatable.
  • The best change from book to film was what happened to the Warden. After Andy’s escape (which is identical in both versions), Warden goes a bit loopy and retires early, always wondering how Andy managed to outsmart him. In the film, he’s found out for all the scams he’s running and fatally shoots himself.

Stephen King’s writing was impeccable, as always; it felt very ’50s, with plenty of old slang that was a joy to read. There were some amazingly funny quotes, too, which had me giggling as I read the paperback on the train.

“A man humping his butt across country in a gray pajama
suit sticks out like a cockroach on a wedding cake.”

“Cell doors opened; prisoners stepped in; cell doors closed. Some clown shouting, ‘I want my lawyer, I want my lawyer, you guys run this place just like a frigging prison.’”

“One wit suggested that Andy had poured himself out through the keyhole. The suggestion earned the guy four days in solitary. They were uptight.”

The image of an inmate, who probably detests the guards and is good at acting dumb, making a completely useless suggestion for kicks tickled me pink.

Overall, the book was a charming day in the life (though the story spans over several decades) of two inmates, one of which manages the impossible out of patience, dreams, and hope. Andy is a gorgeous character, mysterious and calm and completely likable. Overall, I think I prefer the movie, but the book was still a pleasure to read and I’ll probably reread it in the future. I give Rita Hayworth and the Shawshank Redemption four stars out of five.

4stars

Get Different Seasons on Amazon US
Get Different Seasons on Amazon UK

Book Review: “Lair” (The Rats Trilogy Book 2) by James Herbert

Lair is the sequel to The Rats, British horror writer James Herbert’s debut novel. Lair was published in 1979, five years after its predecessor and Herbert’s sixth book overall. The old cover art of Lair is too adorable not to show you!

It takes place four years after “the Outbreak,” the coined term for the infestation that led to hundreds dead in London and eventual evacuation to exterminate the filth.

Carrying on from the epilogue, several rats survived the onslaught, and though they are much fewer in number, they escape from their hiding place to wait, hide, and breed until their thirst for human flesh brings them to the surface again.

*Note: this review contains some spoilers.

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“The mutant white rat had grown and mated, creating offspring in its own image. They dominated the others, the dark-furred ones, who foraged for food and brought it back to the lair.

Now the dark rats were restless, tormented by a craving they could not satisfy. But the white slug-like thing that ruled them knew. Its two heads weaved to and fro and a stickiness drooled from its mouth as it remembered the taste of human flesh . . .”

Unlike in The Rats, Lair takes place in Epping Forest, a large wood on the outskirts of London. It takes longer for the vermin to attack this time; there are many “close calls” and sightings, building up the tension for the first third of the novel. Always, I wondered whether a new scene would lead to an unfortunate death or a lucky escape.

One aspect I really liked about the first installment is Herbert’s quick introduction to the backstories and lives of the characters, whether or not they fall victim to the rats. Whether suggested by his editor or on his own, it’s unclear, but it seemed like many of the victims were not very nice people and therefore it was less upsetting and more fun reading about their deaths or encounters with ruined corpses. A couple cheating on their spouses. A pervert who likes to flash young women. A grumpy farmer who doesn’t trust the law.

Harris, the main character from book one, is briefly mentioned, but we’re introduced to a new MC: Ratkill employee called Lucas Pender, our hero of Lair. Their struggle to track down and eliminate the rats in Epping Forest is real. The rats are stronger, smarter, and more deadly than ever before, often outsmarting their mortal enemies even though the humans know not to underestimate them.

Some scenes had me on the edge of my seat. Would they escape? Would the protective suits, which worked so well in the past, hold against the onslaught of vicious teeth? Would they finally destroy the creatures or had the rats hidden too well?

Herbert introduced political aspects to the novel, suggesting the economic consequences of an infestation in Epping Forest, an area that is home to hundreds of people and a green belt area that London politicians would dearly love to seize. The hesitation of the forest’s protectors exacerbates the situation despite Pender’s early warnings, giving the story a very real edge. How many times in the real world has common sense been abandoned for the sake of money and control?

The story was all about action and not much character development. I wasn’t aware Whittaker had a beard until almost the end of the book. If there was any description of Pender, I missed it; I imagined him as a normal-looking white bloke with darkish hair. I wasn’t keen on the love scene, but that’s personal preference; I tend to skip over over-the-top descriptions of sex and it didn’t feel it really had a place in a sci-fi horror. I appreciate that it might have been a respite from the gore, however, and it didn’t ruin the story for me.

All in all, Lair was pretty good. The shock value had worn off after recently reading The Rats, of course – there are only so many ways you can describe someone getting torn apart and eaten to death – but Herbert handled it well, offering fresh environments and more tension with creative new ways for the rats to attack and take their victims by surprise.

The ending was great. We finally find out the location of the rats’ lair and there was plenty of excitement. I can’t say much else without giving it all away!

If you haven’t read The Rats yet, it’s a great classic horror. I’ll probably wait a while to read the final in the trilogy, Domain, so perhaps the gory scenes can be shocking and scary again. That being said, Lair had plenty of tension to make up for it, and it’ll be interesting to see where Domain takes the story of these mutant rats that just won’t die! Lair was a fun read, and I give it four stars out of five.

4stars

Get Lair on Amazon US
Get Lair on Amazon UK

10 Upcoming Sakura-Themed Goodies to Get You Hyped for Cherry Blossom Season

Is it that time of year already?!

The other day, I stumbled across a Starbucks sakura latte in a Family Mart convenience store. It’s just one of the many exciting sakura-themed treats we’ll be experiencing for the approaching cherry blossoms, the pink flowers that bloom for just a few weeks in early spring.

People go crazy for it; they lay out picnic sheets, prepare a huge amount of food and beer, and have a great time under the falling petals. It’s enormous fun and I’ll be sure to attend at least one of these events, “hanami” in Japanese, in March.

To celebrate, here are ten upcoming (and current) goodies that various companies release for one of Japan’s most beloved seasons.

1. The Starbucks Sakura Latte

Starbucks is as well loved here as it is anywhere, and the huge American coffee chain has wasted no time in releasing its strawberry jelly treat. Served hot or cold, it’s recommended you only buy this if you really like sweet drinks.

2. Lipton’s Sakura Milk Tea

Don’t like coffee? How about tea?! Lipton’s is releasing a brand new Sakura-infused milk tea to celebrate the upcoming blossoms. You can read more about this on SoraNews.

3. Sakura Kit Kats

Kit Kats may have hailed from the town of York in England, but Japan has made them great. Gaining traction in Japan for their name, which sounds like “kitto katsu” (I’ll surely win) in Japanese and thus giving schoolchildren a boost when they buy them in exam season, Kit Kats now come in an enormous amount of different flavors, ranging from green tea and pumpkin to strawberry and sake.

It’s no surprise, then, that Kit Kats are bought by the bucketful when sakura season rolls around.

4. The Limited-Edition Sakura Pie at Lotteria

Lotteria is a fast-food place mostly selling burgers, similar to McDonald’s. In 2017, they brought out a limited-edition sakura pie for just 180 yen (about $2 USD). It was really delicious, and fans of this sweet treat are praying for a re-release.

5. Sakuramochi

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Sakuramochi have been around for decades; mochi is the word for rice cake, and this seasonal treat is soft rice filled with red bean paste and wrapped in a salted sakura leaf. It’s insanely more-ish and you can find them in supermarkets all over the country come cherry blossom time.

6. Sakura Milk

Perfect for kids and those who aren’t keen on coffee, this snack-sized treat adds a cherry blossom twist to normal milkshakes. I’ll definitely be grabbing one next time I visit Kaldi Coffee.

7. McDonald’s Sakura Teriyaki Egg Burger

Not keen on sweets? You won’t miss out! Every spring, McDonald’s comes up with a range of sakura-themed treats, determined not to be missed out. They have a whole menu of sakura stuff: drinks, burgers, and even fries sprinkled with special cherry blossom salt.

I’m hoping for a return of the sakura teriyaki egg burger. It sounds so bad it has to be good.

8. Lindt’s Sakura Menu

Lindt has shops all over the place in Japan, the sales of their pricy but high-quality cacao-filled treats boosting in February and March anyway due to Valentine’s Day and White Day, respectively. They continue to sell well by introducing their sakura-themed menu, imitating other cafes with blossom-infused drinks and selling their own sakura macarons.

9. Eitaro’s Sakura Jelly

This sakura-themed jelly is a frequent yearly release by Eitaro that dessert-lovers should keep an eye out for. It’s 300 yen for one piece, making it slightly pricier than some others on this list, but a great treat for fans of sakura-infused foods.

10. Sakura Coca Cola

Yet another international brand jumps on the cherry blossom bandwagon! With other Japan-exclusive flavours such as peach cola, it’s not much of a surprise that sakura coke is a thing, too. The fizzy drink is already pretty sweet, so it remains to be seen whether the blossom infusion will improve it or not.

Seasons and related foods change fast, so grab these sakura goodies while you can! Before we know it, it’ll be summer and we’ll all be fainting under the humidity again.

Video Game Review: “Super Smash Bros. Ultimate” on Nintendo Switch

I love my Switch. I finally got one in January ’19 as a sort of “reward” for getting a bunch of work done. After dropping numerous hints (fine, begging), my husband didn’t budge. As they say, if you want something, you’d better get it yourself.

Super Smash Bros. Ultimate is a must for the latest Nintendo console, of course. I downloaded it and dove (dived?) straight in.

I’ve been playing Smash games since I was a kid and battling my little brother on the Nintendo 64. Melee (was that 18 years ago? DAMN!), Brawl, and the Wii version were all great fun, and I was introduced to the world of online play when I got my Wii U.

Gameplay

Nintendo has, wisely, kept the dynamics of Smash pretty much the same as the previous games. You’re presented with a menu and energetic music, pumping you up for a fight. There’s an offline mode of regular ‘smashing’ where every ten minutes of gameplay, a new character challenge appears and you beat them to unlock them. There’s a one-player mode (which I haven’t played much of yet) and, of course, an option to play online.

Characters

I’m not going to jump on the meme bandwagon and get enraged that Waluigi isn’t a playable character because Wario is my waifu. Although I think Nintendo goes overboard with Fire Emblem characters (no doubt appeasing its Japanese audience; the game isn’t that popular overseas, as far as I know), we got a good selection (over 70!) characters to choose from.

I was delighted to see the return of my personal favorites: Princess Peach, Ganondorf (beautifully overpowered), Wario, Kirby, Zelda, Wii Fit Trainer (shut up, she’s cool) and Bayonetta (for aesthetic purposes only; I suck at actually playing as her).

Online

Smash Bros. Ultimate online has to be one of the most frustrating yet addictive experiences in the history of gaming. Do I suck at this game, or do other people really spend fourteen hours a day in multiplayer? The few times I do actually win I’m over the moon, and I’m not ashamed to admit that getting my butt kicked several times in a row has reduced me to tears more than once.

But whatevs.

Quickplay Mode gives you everything you need to quickly enter a battle. You can even adjust the preferred rules by choosing one-on-one, group smash, or team battles, and choose between stock or timed. If you’re happy with anything, you can switch the preferred rules off.

Stages

The stages are fantastic! As well as golden oldies like Pokémon Stadium 2, Hyrule Castle, and Corneria, we can see a huge amount of new stages. Some are upgraded versions of old ones, some are incredibly annoying and, best of all, we don’t have to unlock them. Of course, we also see the return of a hazard-free Final Destination.

Glitches

Nintendo is usually great at releasing virtually glitch-free games, as opposed to some western companies who are so full of bugs they need to release a bunch of patches to make it playable. However, Ultimate‘s Battle Arena Mode needs work.

More often than not, I can’t find my friends if they open an Arena, and vice-versa. It makes playing online with friends impossible at times, which is a shame as I have a few people I’d love to smash with. Hopefully, Nintendo will sort out this strange phenomenon.

Spirits

A new version of a game needs new features, of course; as well as extra characters and updated graphics, Nintendo decided to introduce Spirits, which power up your character and give boosts to your defense, attack, and grab.

I don’t think I’m the only one who has zero interest in Spirits.

I just want to play! Smash Bros. battles are a test of skill, always have been. It wouldn’t be fair to be beaten by someone sub-par just because they collected a load of Attack Spirits or whatever. Thankfully, Spirits can be switched off in Online Mode.

Smash Bros. Ultimate is a fun experience and a must for any Nintendo Switch owner. Playing online can be frustrating if you’re not amazing, but it’s motivation to get better and watch your global score rise (not so fun to watch it fall).

I’d give it five stars if not for the Battle Arena glitches and the pointless Spirits. I give Ultimate four stars out of five.

4stars

Valentine’s Day JUST Ended And We’re Already Seeing This

It never stops with special events and festival goods spurring businesses to launch the latest and greatest relevantly-themed product.

Valentine’s Day in Japan involves women giving their loved ones and male coworkers chocolates. As you might expect, sales of this sugary treat skyrocket around late January and early February. I did my own share of choccy shopping and am eagerly awaiting reciprocal gifts on White Day.

That being said, Valentine’s Day JUST ended, and already I came across THIS.

Sakura season is ages away! New Year’s Eve was just five minutes ago… wasn’t it?

Trust Starbucks to get ahead with cherry blossom themed drinks.

Buying branded coffee in convenience stores is way cheaper than going to the cafes themselves, and I picked this up for around 170 yen (closer to 600 in an actual Starbucks). I just had to grab this early treat to celebrate the yearly blossom of pink and white flowers millions across the country will enjoy and celebrate in March.

Chocolate and strawberry jelly; what could go wrong?

Verdict: it was revolting.

Book Review: “The Rats” (The Rats Trilogy Book 1) by James Herbert

I am all about horror at the moment!

After finishing Nobody True, my mum recommended I read The Rats, James Herbert’s debut novel. I had a faint memory of my dad saying he’d read it and it had “scared the crap” out of him. And my dad’s a big man who doesn’t scare easily.

I bought The Rats. As you might imagine, it’s about rats. The original cover just screams ’70s, don’t you think?

*Note: this review contains minor spoilers.

rats-new_1

“It was only when the bones of the first devoured victims were discovered that the true nature and power of these swarming black creatures with their razor sharp teeth and the taste for human blood began to be realized by a panic-stricken city.

For millions of years man and rats had been natural enemies. But now for the first time – suddenly, shockingly, horribly – the balance of power had shifted . . .”

Imagine any horror film. Most likely the opening scene is some unlucky sod getting mauled/attacked/sliced apart as a spooky introduction to the antagonist. The Rats starts out in much the same way, except, unlike a movie, we learned a bit about the character before they met their unfortunate fate.

I actually really liked this. We were given tidbits, a run-through of the person’s life, even if that was the last time we would ever “see” them alive. Some might argue this is pointless – why would you care about their lives, hopes, and past mistakes that led them to their untimely death?

I realized that it’s because of their past lives that they ended up getting killed in such a horrible way. Take Henry, the vagrant at the very beginning of the story. Perhaps if it wasn’t for his office affair that led to defamation, resignation, and eventually crippling loneliness that took him from successful businessman to alcoholic vagabond, he wouldn’t have slept in the abandoned house where the first of the killer rats attacked.

Take Dave, the teenager who was on his way home to catch the last train after messing around with his girlfriend. Maybe if he’d gotten an earlier train, stayed over at her house, or not met up with her that night at all (not necessarily a mistake, but an unfortunate coincidence), he wouldn’t have ventured into the station from which came the inevitable attack.

The mother who left her one-year-old alone to nip next door to borrow some tea (yes, it’s a British book) may not have perished along with her baby if only she’d taken her daughter with her. George the zookeeper ended up getting mauled by one of his beloved animals after he foolishly let it out of its cage instead of saving himself.

Harris is the main character of this story, and I liked him a lot. He’s brave, though he doesn’t try to play the hero; he’s a school teacher, a normal bloke with common sense but who wants to help out the area where he grew up, first in his career and then with the infestation. The rats themselves are really scary; they’re well-described, absolutely vicious, and Herbert did a great job of portraying the situations where you knew that as soon as one rat showed up, you knew the victim would be overwhelmed within moments.

Harris and the police struggle to beat back the terrifying rat infestation. These fearless creatures are getting bolder by the day, and it’s only a matter of time before the whole city is taken down. The amount of action and sense of urgency kept the pages turning.

The Rats was published in 1974, whereas Nobody True was released in 2003. The Rats is not badly written by any means, but I could see how Herbert’s writing style developed from his debut to the later novel, which ran much more smoothly. Writers never cease to improve if they constantly work on their craft, and part of me wishes I’d read The Rats first as, compared to Nobody True, some of the prose was quite clunky. There were also several typos in the Kindle edition, which surprised me.

These didn’t ruin my experience, though, and it shouldn’t deter you from reading it, either. The Rats is a classic novel every horror fan should pick up and I give it four stars out of five. I’ll definitely be buying the next one, Lair.

4stars

Get The Rats on Amazon US
Get The Rats on Amazon UK

Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Nobody True” by James Herbert

I enjoy reading now, but I read a lot more as a child. My mother has probably gobbled up even more novels than I have; when I was growing up, she’d have stacks and stacks of books, shelves stuffed of volumes, rooms packed with tomes, tables groaning under paperbacks. Before the days of the Kindle, her collection looked even more impressive.

There was a book I’d read part of when I was a kid, around twelve or thirteen years old. I’d always remembered the story, and when she came to visit I described the plot. Like the genius she is, she rattled off the author’s name at once and we found it: Nobody True! I remembered the cover and also remembered I’d read half of it. I don’t know why I stopped reading; looking back, the theme was probably too mature for me at the time.

There were many things about the book I’d forgotten, but the hook is a winner: what if you astral travelled, gained control of out-of-body experiences, even using this skill to explore the world around you without limits? And what if, one night during a business trip, you came back and you had been killed? Not only murdered, but brutally so: hacked, mutilated, your body completely destroyed?

The hook stayed with me, and it’s for that purpose I sought out the novel again.

4e6612c40a39f602e4dba518684016ee“What happens when you lose your body?

Jim True knows. He has returned from an out-of-body experience to find he has been brutally murdered and his body mutilated. No one can see him, no one can hear him, no one, except his killer, knows he still exists. Freed from his body, True embarks on a quest to find his killer and discover why and how he has managed to survive.

As he closes in on his murderer, True discovers that even the very people he loved and trusted have betrayed him. He meets his killer, a strange and sinister figure who can also leave his body at will.

In James Herbert’s Nobody True, an epic and deadly battle ensues between True and a seemingly unstoppable and hideous serial killer – a man now intent on even more murders, including True’s wife and child.”

Contrary to many of the books I review, this novel is relatively old; Nobody True was published in 2003 by Pan Macmillan. Herbert himself died in 2013, but I enjoyed this book so much I felt compelled to write this review.

Herbert’s writing style is witty, snappy, and engaging, which drew me in from the very first line, although the main character (the book is written in first person) tends to go off on tangents a bit (something the MC, Jim True, acknowledges). There is a lot of speculation on actual astral travelling, and the book is written as though the event actually happened, a trait I love in any genre of book and something that also appears in The Saga of Darren Shan, which is also, interestingly, a horror.

The plot was full of twists and turns, some of which I expected, other ones I didn’t. I found one of the twists at the end was mildly interesting but unimportant in the grand scheme of things, but that didn’t mar my enjoyment; in fact, it made me want to read the book again to look out for clues for said twist.

There were parts of this book that terrified me; at many points I was holding the phone (I was using the Kindle app; it’s costly to send paperbacks to Japan) an inch or so from my face, with what I imagine is a wide-eyed expression when I was reading on the train and whatnot. The only book that has scared me more is Gerald’s Game by Stephen King, though it was close. I think I actually enjoyed Nobody True more as a whole.

There are several people in the story you might consider to be antagonists, though undoubtedly the main one is the serial killer, a monster both inside and out. Suffering a facial deformity from birth, bitterness, jealousy, and insanity have twisted this killer into a merciless, horrifying mess. This serial killer was truly terrifying, described with flair.

As well as an exciting horror story, there was even a nice sentiment or lesson to be learned from the book as a whole. Though it had been a brutal story, it left a pleasant feeling at the end, a message that is relevant to everyone. I’ll let you find that one out for yourself, though.

My only issue with the book is that we don’t find out what happens to one of the characters, and though this can easily be explained away by the book’s message, I was still waiting for an explanation as to what happened to them. Nevertheless, Nobody True was fantastic and I’m really glad I remembered it and sought it out. My mum has introduced me to some great works and I doubt this one will be the last. I give this book five stars!

5stars

Get Nobody True on Amazon US
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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Reavers of the Tempest” by J.M.D. Reid

Not gonna lie; I love matte covers.

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Following Above the Storm is the second installment of J.M.D. Reid’s The Storm Below series, a five-segment fantasy telling the story of a world above an ever-churning blanket of clouds and lightning. The Storm was conjured to rise the lands of the faithful, and now races live in (relative) peace in the sun, leaving the doomed, named the Stormriders for the deadly Cyclones they wield, in darkness.

What more could there be to worry about besides the dangers of the Navy, including gigantic tornadoes hell-bent on destroying everything one loves, as well as the tormented ramblings of a chained, tortured goddess? Oh, right. . . a jealous friend, a frustrated assassin, and a pocketful of plague.

reavers-ebook_reid-1800x1200“Pirates rampage across the skies!

Ary, Chaylene, and the crew of the skyship Dauntless are called into action again! The Bluefin Raiders pillage and burn, but the greatest threat lurks aboard the ship…

Vel plots murder.

Wanting Chaylene for himself, he waits for his chance to poison Ary. Only it’s not poison he carries…

It’s a plague.”

The story continues to focus on Ary, Chaylene, and poor, foolish Vel’s love triangle. However, this is just one of the many plots of the story. Reavers of the Tempest is a military fantasy through and through.

Though the dangers of Cyclones remain, our young characters are called to action to fight against the Bluefin Raiders, vicious pirates who pillage the skies, murder, and steal ships and their cargo. In the shadows, Vel plots murder, blinded by infatuation for Chaylene and encouraged by an assassin.

More of the world and the truth behind its history are revealed in The Storm Below‘s second installment, leaving readers hungry for more. Ary is plagued by dreams and visions of a trapped goddess and discovers there is more to him being Stormtouched than being condemned by the Church, something that might even help them…

What really made this book for me was the exciting finale. Ary’s discovery of his newfound power, the struggle against the pirates, and the consequences of Vel’s actions all tie nicely together for a powerful installment of this series.

I’m thoroughly enjoying The Storm Below. It’s not a world I’ll be able to forget easily and though the cast of characters grows with each book, they are real and distinct enough where I don’t get confused (with the main characters, at least). I give Reavers of the Tempest five stars!

5stars

Get Reavers of the Tempest on Amazon US
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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Above the Storm” by J.M.D. Reid

It arrived!

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I’d already read the ebook, but I decided to get a paperback of J.M.D. Reid’s debut novel, Above the Storm. It’s the first in a five-piece series called The Storm Below telling the intricate story of a floating world above an endless, churning storm – a unique world you’ll have a hard time forgetting.

I’ve been a fan of J.M.D. Reid ever since I came across his short story, The Assassin’s Remorse. Captivated by Reid’s world-building, I was an instant fan. He’s been talking about his The Storm Below series for years; no doubt such an enormous, detailed universe with its own rules, characters and, of course, the story itself, has taken years of this talented author’s time and energy. Above the Storm dropped in October 2018.

50414323_1199432536879361_3773116747922538496_n“To save the world, Ary must die!

Ary, a young man scarred by his past, is thrust into the dangers of the military. But he carries a deadly secret: the dark goddess’s touch stains his soul. 

Her taint threatens to destroy all he loves.

He must hide the truth from the other marines and the woman he loves. Can Ary survive the dangers of service and the zealous assassin plotting his death?

Are you ready for the action, danger, romance, and betrayal exploding across the skies Above the Storm!”

I wasn’t new to Reid’s Above the Storm world when I first delved into this novel, having already read same-world shorts such as Plight of the Arshion and The Captain’s Mad Plan. The ever-swirling Storm separates the good, Riasruo-worshipping races from the Wrackthar, those left below after the war two centuries earlier. Those below, nicknamed the Stormriders, send vicious Cyclones to attack those they envy above, and the military protects its citizens from destruction.

When they come of age, every citizen of the Autonomy and the Empire receive Blessings from the sun goddess, Riasruo, in one of three levels: Lightning, Pressure, Wind, and Mist, on the Summer Solstice of their seventeenth year. Ary and his two best friends, Chaylene and Vel, all receive their Blessings and Ary hopes to marry Chaylene and work as a farmer in their hometown, Vesche.

During Ary’s childhood when a Cyclone attacked his town, he foolishly stayed behind to watch, enthralled by the action. Struck by lightning during the battle and therefore touched by Theisseg, Riasruo’s unholy sister, Ary dreams of the trapped Storm Goddess and is tormented by her pain.

Drafted into the military, Ary and Chaylene marry to stay together before they must face four years of naval duty and to join the good fight against the Cyclone-wielding Stormriders. With Vel jealous of their relationship, the pressures of duty, vicious rumors about Chaylene’s fidelity, the ever-churning dangers of those from beneath the Storm, and whispers of an assassin in Ary’s midst, Reid’s debut novel is a fantasy adventure that you’ll find impossible to forget.

I’ve always liked Reid’s writing style; it flows well, activates your imagination, and impresses with originality. Above the Storm is fantasy, certainly, though it is a romance secondly, focusing on the love triangle between Ary, Chaylene, and Vel. My favorite characters are Zori, a fiercely loyal and fun-loving girl who joined the Navy to escape a life of prostitution, and Estan, a Vaarckthian scholar with an inquisitive mind who fell out with his wealthy family when his thirst for knowledge questioned the teachings of the Church.

Not all is as it seems in Above the Storm; in fact, the first novel barely scratches the surface of the real, horrific truths. I was thirsting for more when I finished this book, to follow the several storylines and find the answers to the questions I had.

I give Above the Storm five stars!

5stars

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Visit J.M.D. Reid’s blog

Book Review: “Caitlyn (Book Two) A Stain on the Soul” by Elizabeth Davies

After thoroughly enjoying the refreshingly well-written Caitlyn (Book One) Three Bloody Pieces by Elizabeth Davies, I eagerly jumped into the next one. I really admire Davies’ writing skill; every sentence sings, making it a smooth and brilliantly fun journey.

*This article contains minor spoilers

A-Stain-on-the-Soul-eCover

“Resigned to another lifetime of being a witch’s familiar, Caitlyn has found a degree of peace in her role as the Duke of Normandy’s protector and spy.

But that peace is shattered when she returns to her native land only to come face-to-face with her past, and fall in love with a man who she desperately hopes will become her future.”

Caitlyn has been bound to Arlette for years and feels like a mother to Arlette’s son, William, who covets the English crown. I was excited when I realised that this character is actually the real William the Conqueror! Elizabeth Davies has cleverly woven real events with the magical, providing explanations that work for real-life events.

I continue to admire and sympathise with Caitlyn as she is forced to stay with her mistress and help her get her son on the throne by committing vile acts she doesn’t want to do. At first, I was taken aback by the fact that so many years had gone by; Caitlyn never got revenge for the attack on her kingdom and was never known to be of royal blood over those decades. This wasn’t a typical story of getting’s one justice and living happily ever after; Caitlyn did what she does best and just got on with things, keeping her chin up, through a life she never could have foreseen.

I liked this book a lot. Davies’ skillful writing makes the story twist and turn in ways you don’t expect. I admit I wasn’t completely sold on her falling in love so easily; it seemed she locked eyes with a handsome stranger, tumbled with him a few times, and then they were suddenly madly in love with each other, all for it to be for nothing when William made his excuses for her to leave. I am also not a fan of detailed sex scenes (though this is personal preference). It’s for these reasons I give the book four stars.

Even though I wasn’t sure about some parts of the story midway, the book did not falter. Caitlyn was sensible with her relationship, accepting that it couldn’t ever turn into anything more serious because of the magic hold on her. When you finally think that she is free of the witch controlling her life and her being, the story comes to a thrilling finish with a twist I didn’t see coming. I’m very thirsty for the next story, so keep your eyes peeled for a review of the final installment of this awesome trilogy!

4stars

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Get A Stain on the Soul on Amazon UK