A Day in “Coedo” Kawagoe, Saitama Prefecture

Just half an hour from Ikebukuro is Kawagoe, a town in Saitama that is affectionately nicknamed “Coedo” or “Little Edo” for its resemblance to the Edo era. Many old buildings and landmarks untouched by war and fire still stand, and it’s a lovely place to visit for a day trip.

Unlike other hotspots like Senso-ji Temple and Kyoto, Kawagoe didn’t have many foreign tourists at all. Saitama, the prefecture just north of Tokyo, is often overlooked by visitors, but I recommend Kawagoe for its peaceful atmosphere.

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Though a bit of a trek from the station, the attractive part of town is worth the walk. The cute buildings and the shouts of stall staff hard at work gave the streets a nostalgic atmosphere.

The Time Bell is a must-see; its chime is one of the 100 Soundscapes of Japan.

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On every street, there was something to do or see, whether it was coffee, ice cream, or traditional toys to take home.

Walking around was thirsty work, so we stopped for a Coedo beer. Right opposite is a unique-looking Starbucks if you prefer coffee.

After exploring, we stopped for some food. My husband managed to bypass all the expensive touristy places and found a charming hole-in-the-wall ramen shop run by a little old lady. She had money all over the wall from visitors from various countries, and she only served one dish: shoyu (soy sauce)-based ramen, a signature type of noodles for this region.

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This delicious and hearty bowl of ramen, plus a small bowl of rice with a little umeboshi plum, came to just 500 yen!

We also went to visit some temples, though I didn’t take any pictures aside from the enormous torii gate.

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If you ever get the chance to visit Kawagoe, please do! It involves some walking, but it’s a really beautiful and peaceful area without the crowds you get at some other places.

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A Short Break in the Japanese Countryside

A few weeks ago, I had the opportunity to visit a town in Nagano Prefecture called Okaya. I lived there from 2014 to 2016 and hadn’t been there since, so it was great to be able to go and hang out with my friend and get some fresh air.

I love Tokyo, but stepping off the bus into the quietness of Okaya “city” was peaceful. There were so few people! I went to a nearby shop to browse the clothes and ended up finding some amazing deals, such as a skirt for just 200 yen.

The old man at the cashier wasn’t the usual moving-at-the-speed-of-light-to-serve-you-as-fast-as-possible like you’d see in the capital, but he slowly and carefully cut off the tags and input the amounts in the till at his own pace. I, with nothing to do except kill time to wait for Alex, found myself smiling as I watched him take his time.

I had a cold while I was there so unfortunately, I couldn’t really smell the fresh air, but I saw the sky, heard and saw frogs, and enjoyed the peace of few people. And this was festival week; it was actually crowded for the area at the time!

Though we didn’t go to the festival in the evening when it kicked off properly, I watched Alex try his hand at a shooting game.

Alex’s house was a twenty-minute walk from his station, and trains from Okaya only went every hour or so. There were houses, rice fields, and amazing views of the hills. I found myself gushing like a city girl seeing grass for the first time.

I was only there for two nights, so I didn’t get to do or eat everything I wanted, but it was a wonderful time nonetheless. I got to catch up with old friends I hadn’t seen in years and have a short break from the business of Tokyo. Next time, I hope I can stay for a lot longer.

My First Japanese Manga Comic: Tsubaki-Chou Lonely Planet

Over my years of living in Japan, I’ve been asked many times if the reason I like this country is because of anime (cartoons) or manga (comics). This is a common reason for people to visit Japan. Even if you’re not into these things, it’s likely you’ve watched some anime in your lifetime, whether it be Dragonball, Pokémon, or Sailor Moon.

I always answered “no.” I watched Death Note when I was a teenager and was crazy about Pokémon as a kid, but they weren’t the reasons I decided to live in this country.

I studied Japanese at university and often pick up new words and phrases during my time living here, but I never really got to a higher level of Japanese. I can’t read newspapers or novels and I wouldn’t be able to pass any JLPT (Japanese Language Proficiency Test) level higher than intermediate. As an English teacher and writer, I don’t need any language test qualification so never really had the motivation to study.

Manga comics were always intimidating. How would I be able to read an entire book in Japanese? How would I navigate the seemingly complicated up-down left-right reading style? Despite seeing thousands of manga books in shops and whatnot, I never picked one up.

I get bursts of motivation to study, however, and bought Tsubaki-Chou Lonely Planet for 400 yen in a book shop.

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It sat on my shelf for ages, but I don’t like having books and never reading them. I forced myself to study the first two pages, taking notes of words I didn’t know. It took a while. Then my husband let me read it to him. There was furigana above the kanji (sort of pronunciation guides) so it didn’t take as long as it would have if it had been a manga aimed at adults.

After about a quarter of the way through, I got used to how to read it and started enjoying the story. Not worrying too much about understanding every single word, I read it on the train and finished it in just a few days.

The Story

Fumi Ono is determined to help her father get out of debt and applies to be a live-in housekeeper. When arriving at the house on Tsubaki Street, she’s amazed to find the writer who lives there isn’t a friendly old man as she’d expected, but a slightly strange, young, grumpy person who turns out to be Kibiki, the writer.

At first, they don’t get along. Kibiki-sensei is grouchy and doesn’t seem happy to have the young Fumi around. However, their relationship develops.

This reads like a typical romance in Japan but it was touching nevertheless. Lines like “you live here, so you’re my responsibility. I will protect you” tugged on the heartstrings. The story was really funny, as well; their bickering and the art style portraying shock or discomfort had me giggling.

Fumi is a cool character. She’s 16, polite, hardworking, and determined to be independent. When a local panty snatcher steals her underwear from where it’s hanging, she fiercely tries to confront him herself, before Kibiki-sensei shows up to help.

I think I consider myself a fan of manga now. I learned many new words and my reading speed has improved. I’ll definitely be buying the next installment of this light-hearted romance.