Guys I Just Had Ramen That Blew My Mind

Today I was craving ramen, and my boyfriend can never say no to ramen. So we found this place near our house.

It’s called Mame-kin Gyoza and it serves Chinese noodles. They had a spicy hotpot with which you can have gyoza (dumplings), or tsukemen (that you can dip into the hot soup.)

I chose both, naturally. The picture had five little pictures of peppers and wooooo it was spicy indeed.

The hotpot thing had vegetables, pork, shiitake mushrooms, chili peppers, and even some fish ball stuff that you find in oden.

It was super hot and spicy and tasty. I chucked in the cold noodles and gobbled them all up. The gyoza dumplings had also soaked up all that lovely soup.

The waiter put two small bowls down so my boyfriend and I could share but he underestimated my power. I shoved all that in my belly and it was D E L I S H.

If you like ramen, visit Mame-kin Gyoza for yummy spicy tsukemen noodles! ❤️

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Top 8 Experiences in Ishigaki, Okinawa

I’ve been on a social media hiatus the past week or so, and it’s been quite refreshing. Tied in with that was my three-night stay on Ishigaki, the westernmost island of Okinawa, Japan. It was exactly what I needed to get rid of the stress that has been building up lately. If you’re stressed and you can afford it, an island holiday is a great pick-up.

I never really thought of myself as a tropical island person. I like mountains, rivers, and cities. But I loved Ishigaki. The contrast between the rather cold Tokyo and the open friendliness of the island people was surprising and refreshing. Despite it being February, Ishigaki’s weather lingered between 20-25 degrees Celsius. And there was so much space. So few people.

I won’t bore you with every single detail, but here are the best things I did in Ishigaki and the surrounding islands.

1. The Limestone Cave

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What I was expecting to be a touristy and highly commercialized spot was surprisingly awesome. We followed a path to admire some stalactites and stalagmites that had formed over thousands of years, sometimes taking on amusing shapes such as Totoro, the famous Studio Ghibli character.
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It was only a ten-minute drive away from the port and there was also a souvenir shop. We also saw some funky cocoons and a creepy-looking crab. It’s worth visiting when you’re in Ishigaki.

2. Trying Wagyu Beef

When you talk about high-quality beef from Japan, most people think of Kobe beef. Ishigaki wagyu is made from the black cows of the local area (whereas Kobe beef is made from the cows in Kobe), and we were hoping to try this high-grade stuff while we were here. A taxi driver recommended a place called Kingyuu, which means gold beef.

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It was just delightful. I’ve never had meat so marbled and tender, and now I finally understand what people mean by “melt in your mouth.” It was a fantastic experience. Kingyuu is just one of the many recommended places to try Ishigaki beef. If you want to go, make reservations.

3. Visiting Hateruma Island

We went to Hateruma Island for the day, which is an hour away by ferry from Ishigaki port. The island is the southernmost part of Japan and was so peaceful. The others on the ferry seemed to melt away and during our time cycling around the island, we didn’t see many other people at all. Just goats and sugar cane fields. It was gorgeous.

I took a photo of some farm workers, who were among the few people we spotted here.

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You can see the southernmost point of Japan if you cycle down to the south coast of Hateruma.

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4. The Beach

I’m not really one for the beach; when I was a kid, “beach” meant big coats, throwing rocks into the sea, and hot flasks of coffee. You wouldn’t really see me relaxing with a bikini and a book. However, we came across this lovely white sand beach on Haterumaand just had to take off our shoes and socks to play.

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There were a few other people there, as well as a guy who seemed to be living there – he had his clothes hung up and was relaxing on a towel with a beer! I felt it would be rude to take a picture of him, but it was a pretty unusual sight.

I didn’t see anyone paddling or writing in the sand, but what’s the point in going to the beach if you’re not going to do those things?

5. Visiting Taketomi Island

Taketomi Island is so nice, but it had a lot more tourists on it than Hateruma had. That being said, there are a lot of experiences you can enjoy here, such as seeing fish from a glass bottom boat and riding a wagon pulled by a water buffalo.

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I had my reservations about the buffalo part (I hadn’t booked it; I’d left all that to Ken), but the animals are strong and get fed well and showered every few steps of the tour. I think they were happy… but I really don’t know. They’re fed and washed and taken care of, so I suppose they’re as happy as buffalos can be.

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Taketomi is full of charming houses, fields of cows, and pretty flowers even in winter. It’s also only a ten-minute ferry ride from Ishigaki, so it’s easily accessible for a half-day trip.

6. A Free Shamisen Show

As part of the water buffalo tour, the man who guided us, a local of Taketomi, played this cute song on the shamisen. It’s unusual and exotic and was an unexpected treat.

7. The Food

Wagyu beef isn’t the only food you can try in Ishigaki. On our last night, we had tempura, maguro (tuna meat) katsu, sashimi, tofu (which tastes a hundred times better here), and thick chunks of pork. The vegetables here are fresh and the mango, in particular, is much better than on the mainland.

8. Swimming in the Pool

The Japanese like to keep by the rules. The pool is generally closed in winter, but if you don’t ask, you don’t get. Ken asked if we could take a dip anyway, and to my surprise, they said yes. No one else was hanging around the pool (25 degrees is hot for me, but I suppose not to everyone), so the pool was empty.

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This was a particularly special moment; my boyfriend asking the hotel staff if we could swim, and for us to be alone there, taking in the sea view and having a really refreshing dip before dinner.

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Almost the entire trip was fantastic, but these eight things were definitely the highlights. Getting away from the stress of the city was completely refreshing. I adore Tokyo, but I’d suffered from writer’s block and anxiety and didn’t realise how much I was feeling it until I had this very relaxing three-day trip to Okinawa. If you’re thinking of visiting this tropical prefecture, I highly recommend Ishigaki.

Spoiler-Free Book Review: “The Queen’s Rising” by Rebecca Ross

Hi, everyone. I just got back from Ishigaki in Okinawa, and it was a few days’ rest I desperately needed. Keep an eye out for photos and blog posts.

While on my trip, I read a book I’d been waiting to read for a while. I’d seen it on Twitter and immediately fell in love with the cover. It was a debut fantasy novel by American writer Rebecca Ross, someone I’ve come to admire deeply. I bought it and read it any spare minute that I wasn’t playing about on the beach or sampling the delicious Okinawan food.

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“Brienna desires only two things: to master her passion and to be chosen by a patron. Growing up in Valenia at the renowned Magnalia House should have prepared her. While some are born with a talent for one of the five passions—art, music, dramatics, wit, and knowledge—Brienna struggled to find hers until she chose knowledge. However, Brienna’s greatest fear comes true—she is left without a patron. 

Months later, her life takes an unexpected turn when a disgraced lord offers her patronage. Suspicious of his intent, she reluctantly accepts. But there is much more to his story, for there is a dangerous plot to overthrow the king of Maevana—the rival kingdom of Valenia—and restore the rightful queen, and her magic, to the throne. And others are involved—some closer to Brienna than she realizes.

And now, with war brewing, Brienna must choose which side she will remain loyal to: passion or blood.”

I felt a pull to this book immediately, and from the first page, I knew I’d made the right choice. Ross writes with flair and explains details flawlessly, using sights and smells, especially, to really suck me into the world without going overboard on description. Brienna was sort of the anti-Mary-Sue; it was refreshing to come across a character who struggled with her pursuits. She was not gifted with art or music like her patron sisters, and eventually chose to passion in knowledge, working hard to catch up to her classmate. This book also defied stereotypes, and things which I thought I saw coming a mile away turned out to be entirely different than I expected. There were also twists that made me audibly gasp, which I think annoyed some of the surrounding travellers.

Some reviewers so far have complained that there was no action until later in the book, but I genuinely enjoyed exploring the world that Ross created, with its scents and beautifully described Magnalia House, the school in which Brienna studied. I don’t believe that all books should have brushes with death to hook you in from the first page, and I was gently seduced into the story. Ross’ prose is just gorgeous. I felt aching in my heart reading this book, inspired envy, and was captivated by the story she told.

I recommend this gorgeously crafted novel to any lover of fantasy, who enjoys discovering new worlds and learning rich and unique histories. Although there were several questions left unanswered at the end of the story, this is a fantastic stand-alone tale that I hope every book lover reads. I give The Queen’s Rising five stars out of five.

5stars

Get The Queen’s Rising on Amazon US
Get The Queen’s Rising on Amazon UK

Peach Coca-Cola in Japan: Gross or Great?

I’d heard a bit about peach cola floating around in Japan. It’s just one of the many experimental flavours of drinks and the like that pop up now and then in the country. You’ll see crazy varieties of crisps, chocolate, alcohol, and soft drinks. I saw a bottle of peach cola in Daiso and grabbed a bottle.

Peach is quite a common flavour. You can get peace juice, peach soda, peach alcoholic drinks. What would peach cola be like?

I usually don’t drink cola unless it has whiskey in it, but I took a swig. At first it just tastes like regular cola, but the peach flavour comes afterward, at the top of your mouth. There is also a peachy aftertaste mixing with the usual slightly acidic sensation of coke.

I personally don’t think it’s that special. If you’re old enough to drink, you can get very similar peachy flavours with better drinks, such as peach horoyoi (3% alcohol). Though I suppose if you’re a huge fan of cola, it might be worth a try.

Basically, it tastes pretty much how you’d expect. Quite tasty, but nothing groundbreaking.

Yakiniku (Korean Barbecue) in Japan

It’s the weekend, and a national holiday on Monday! I’m getting geared up to spend the next three days killing dragons, hunting monsters, and reading books. Not necessarily in that order.

We had yakiniku for dinner, which is the local word for Korean barbecue. You get a grill at your table and order stuff to put on the fire. The meat is all cut thinly so that it cooks after just a minute or so.

Restaurants usually offer a tabehoudai (all-you-can-eat) course, but you generally don’t need it. The tabehoudai was around 3,400 yen but they had a set for two people for just 2,500 yen and it was more than enough.

They also had nomihoudai (all-you-can-drink) set, but you could only get it if you already ordered the tabehoudai. Therefore, we got just one bottle of sake and then ordered soft drinks to make our own mixed drinks. Forbidden? No. Cheeky? Maybe.

The set was ginormous, have a look. Please forgive the vertical shot though; I am not a clever man.

We also got a big bowl of rice, some sausages, and some kimchi, which is spicy Korean cabbage and one of my favourite foods ever. I remember going mental when I saw kimchi featured in an episode of QI.

It’s pretty much a meat lover’s dream. We had grilled kalbi beef and sausages and rice and kimchi and onion and carrot and pumpkin until we were full to burst. I also had juice with too much sake in and left the restaurant a little merry.

If you visit Japan, definitely be sure to try out “yakiniku.” It’s one of the best not-Japanese-but-kind-of-Japanese styles of eating you don’t want to miss 😀

Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Angst” by David J. Pedersen

I’ve just finished reading a fantasy novel called Angst, written by David J. Pedersen.

“When Angst turned 40, he knew it was over. Angst had longed to be a knight of Unsel, to make his mark in history, to be remembered for heroic deeds and wondrous acts. He grew up knowing he was destined for something great, but now it is too late. Not only is 40 far too old to become a knight, Angst is one of the few able to wield “the magics”.”

Most protagonists in fantasy novels are young and gifted, destined from birth to be the hero and saviour of the story – often not relatable at all. One of the first things that draws readers to David Pedersen’s Angst is the fact that the main character is the exact opposite of this stereotype.

Angst is the perfect name for this character: he is unsatisfied with his life, a gift that should have been cherished makes him an outcast, and he spends his life in skull-numbing boredom. After turning forty, he believes his dreams of becoming a knight, and subsequent hero, are over. That is until he draws a sword that has been unmovable for as long as anyone can remember. It just might be up to Angst to get to the bottom of the problems plaguing Unsel… once his back stops hurting.

Angst is just an adorable character. Pedersen cleverly captures the mid-life crisis, urge to become something bigger and better, and the fearless, cheeky flirting of a forty-year-old. It was really interesting how these elements fit nicely into a fantasy story.

The story itself was incredibly creative and I’ll have a hard time forgetting many different aspects of the world of Ehrde, including places, beasts, and the concept of the Vex’kvette. I found that I was carrying the book around with me so I could read it on the train and during my lunch breaks.

There were a few things I wasn’t sure about. Something we find out about Heather, Angst’s wife, could have been foreshadowed, along with several other things. I also couldn’t bring myself to like the character Rose, although that is personal preference because I’ve heard she’s a very popular character. Nevertheless, this was a fun story to read and I look forward to reading the next one! I give this book four stars out of five.

Get Angst on Amazon US
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Tokyo’s Blue Winter Sky

Day 38

I haven’t written anything in a few days because work has been really busy. Plus I spent most of last night playing Dragon Age Inquisition.

I was walking to work today when I noticed how beautifully blue the sky was. Winter here is dry and clear, with great views of Mt. Fuji. Even when the skyscrapers tower around you, you still see the perfect blue of the sky if you look up.

A downside of a dry winter is that the country is prone to fires, although with modern heating systems and architecture and the like, it’s becoming less of a problem. It’s also easy to get dehydrated and chapped skin in this season.

Still, when I think about the dark, windy, rainy weather of winter back home, this blue blue blue sky isn’t so bad 😉

Japanese “Purikura”

Day 35

Today I went to Ikebukuro with some friends. We were supposed to be going to some kind of museum exhibition, but as the queue ran down the stairs all the way from the seventh floor down to the second, we gave up on the idea. People here don’t mind lining up hours for something if it’s popular, but none of us had the patience. Instead we ate salad and pizza, yum yum.

Edward really really wanted to do purikura. Purukira, a shortened version of the term “print club,” is a photo booth that adds exaggerated airbrushing to your pictures. You can also add writing, pictures, backgrounds, and stickers to make your photos unique.

It’s against the rules in some purikura places to go in if you’re just one guy or a group of guys. We got some funny stares when I walked behind my three British male friends, who are all taller than the junior high school girls occupying the room.

It’s just 400 yen for a purikura, so 100 yen each. You go inside and have to pose quickly because a picture is taken every couple of seconds. It was really fun, and the boys look so pretty!

If you’d like to try purikura, just go to any arcade in Japan. Just remember that if you’re a group of men, you won’t be able to do it, unfortunately. Maybe they had problems with strange guys peeking in the past. Some tourist attractions like Tokyo Tower also have a purikura booth, sometimes with themed backgrounds and stickers. They’re great for couples or groups of friends.

 

Hamster Babies

Day 34

Mate, I’m really emotional right now.

You might know that I have hamsters, a boy and a girl named Hemingway and Zelda. They’re sweet little things, and on the 22nd January, Zelda gave birth.

She’s got a little house in her cage and since hamsters like a small, dark place to hide, she gave birth in there. I’d known she was pregnant because she got all fat and whenever I put tissues into her cage, she did this:

I kept a close eye on her, removing the top floors of the cage so that the babies wouldn’t fall, cleaning it thoroughly, and adding lots of extra food and bedding. On the 22nd January, the day where Tokyo got all the snow, I heard little squeaky voices coming from her cage.

I’ve done some research on the internet and they say you mustn’t touch the hamster babies for at least two weeks. Every day, I eased into the room as quietly as possible to change the water and add food. Sometimes I couldn’t hear the little squeaks at all and felt alarmed; what if Zelda had killed her babies? Hamsters do that sometimes if they’re frightened.

It’s been two weeks, but it feels like much longer. Today is Saturday, which means that on Monday they I’ll be able to say hello to them and find out how many there are.

Today, as I was giving the little family food and I saw something amazing! One of the babies came out to explore!

But right after I finished taking this video, the little guy stopped moving.

He just lay there, on the ground, eyes closed. I felt like I was falling through the floor and down through the earth. Had I scared him? Had he been weak and crawled off from the others to die? Had he frozen to death without the warmth of his mother?

“No,” I moaned. Only a few days old and he’d already died!

Zelda was rummaging round in the room. I picked her up and put her near the baby. She sniffed at him for a second and then started eating the food I’d put into the cage. I looked at the little baby sadly. I felt horrible, but then…

The little baby moved again!

I couldn’t believe it. He must have played dead, or reacted to the bright light, or even fallen asleep. But suddenly he was as energetic as could be, crawling around the cage until he found their little house again. The pile of bedding was like a mountain for it, but he got inside and I’m sure right now he’s all cuddled up with his brothers and sisters again.

I’m not sure what happened, but I’m so glad he’s all right. I’ll have to start finding a home for these little ones soon, although it would be nice to keep hold of one or two of them!

There’s something quite magical about getting a glimpse of Zelda and Hemingway’s children, seeing their little pink feet and little twitching noses. Well done Zelda, well done babies, and I’ll see you in a few days to start getting to know each other!

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Spoiler-Free Book Review: “Eyes of the Hunter” by Rosa Marchisella

Day 32

‘Sup, everyone! Hope you’re staying warm.

I recently read a book called Eyes of the Hunter, a new fantasy novel by Rosa Marchisella.

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“Prince Erin, heir to the throne of Simanthea, spent a lifetime protecting a dangerous secret no one can know. Not even Caley, Erin’s best friend and devoted bodyguard. 

But even the most tightly guarded secret can’t be kept forever. 

When Caley discovers the depth of Erin’s deception, his rage explodes like wildfire and devoted guardian turns to terrifying bounty hunter. To survive, Erin must outrun the past and evade the Eyes of the Hunter.”

As a lover of fantasy, I gobbled this one up.

After birthing six daughters, Queen Marianna is terrified that if she fails to produce a male heir to the throne of Simanthea, her life will be forfeit. The kingdom rejoices when the birth of a baby boy is announced, and the queen insists that only she care for the baby, whom she names Erin.

She hires a boy, Caley, to protect her son with his life. I truly loved this beginning to the book. I sympathised with the queen, a kind soul who had been basically used by the king “as a breeding mare” for his desire to have a son. Caley was also introduced well, being a shy and quiet boy but delivering when it mattered most. He won the right to become Erin’s guardian.

As a child, Caley was blamed for something he didn’t do and we get a taste of the king’s merciless heart and lack of empathy. When the secret comes out and Erin is forced to run, the atmosphere of the story goes from quiet contentment (if tense) to full-blown excitement and fear.

Caley goes from solid protector to hunter. We see Erin survive, a feat which would not be easy for a pampered member of royalty. However, with Caley’s teachings, Erin can find ways to get through some tough times, which is a little ironic for Caley since he’s now chasing the person he taught.

Rumours fly like wildfire through the land about the hunter, some far-fetched and some not far from the truth, keeping us on our toes as to what Erin will do to shake Caley off, because he always seems closer.

I really enjoyed this book. It was easy to read and Marchisella creates vivid descriptions. I know when I’ve read a good story because my mind wanders to think about the characters at times when I’m not reading, and as this happened a lot, I know the writer did extremely well in creating a world into which I could invest my time and heart.

There were some things that I wasn’t sure about; for example, some skills and knowledge that Erin had were not mentioned before so they could have been foreshadowed. I also felt that another character got the raw end of the deal towards the end of the story but, as we know, life is unfair, and that is possibly what Marchisella was trying to convey.

I recommend Eyes of the Hunter for lovers of fantasy, especially fantasy with rich worlds. I found myself wanting to know more about the kingdoms, what lies beyond the oceans. I’m hoping for a sequel to this engaging tale! Overall, I give it four stars out of five.

4stars

Get Eyes of the Hunter on Amazon US
Get Eyes of the Hunter on Amazon UK