Wholesome Memes For My Friend Rowan

Day 31

Hey everyone! My friend Rowan has been feeling really down lately.

I first met Rowan when we both worked for an English school in Tokyo. I was in training, and was about to watch another teacher so I could learn how things were done. Before entering the classroom, I heard the Irish voice of another teacher kindly saying “You’re doing really, really well and I’m so proud of you! Keep trying!”

Wow, I thought. What a sweetheart.

I met the smiling teacher just a few minutes later. He was dark-haired and all smiles, and greeted me with such enthusiasm that soon I was grinning back. He told me he could speak five languages and asked me to have a great day. He’s back in Ireland now, and I miss him a lot.

21430109_1874197132596498_8660883918431748882_n

Rowan is one of those people who is just nice. To everybody. All the time. He always shows great interest in what other people are doing. I’m proud to call him a friend. I’ve collected some of these wholesome memes to put a smile on everyone’s faces.

Keep going, buddy. Your friends and family love you and you are a precious gem on this earth.

Keep scrolling for wholesome!

Wholesome_0e7db0_6162292

Justin_a3f6c2_6325203

Wholesome_0e6f71_6162292Justin_3402c3_6325203Wholesome_f41fa2_6162292

wholesomememe1wholesomememe2

wholesomememe3

Get well soon ❤

Advertisements

10 Steps to Take to Pick Yourself Up When You’re Feeling Depressed

Day 30

Whether it’s long-term clinical depression or a perpetual bad mood triggered by a traumatic or upsetting event, depression affects thousands of people every year and should be taken seriously. Failure to acknowledge, address, and tend to this issue can lead to physical problems and thoughts of suicide.

window-view-1081788_960_720

I’m not going to tell you to snap out of it, tell you that everyone feels this way sometimes, or worst of all, urge you to think of your loved ones. I don’t know how you feel; only YOU know that. However, I’d like to suggest some steps you can take to hopefully make yourself feel better. Let’s try it.

1. WANT to Get Better

This may sound bizarre to people who have never suffered from depression, but it can be something of an odd comfort to feel so down all the time. It’s twisted, but it feels like it would be easier to stay in perpetual darkness than to turn on the light. This is probably the hardest step of all.

You need to be 100% determined to make yourself feel better, not by force but with healthy steps. Ready to kick depression’s ass? Great! Move on to step two.

2. Address the Problem

Some people suffer from depression throughout their lives, and it isn’t triggered by any unusual event or person. If this is you, move on to step three.

However, for some people, depression comes along in the wake of something bad that happened to them. No matter how trivial you tell yourself the problem is, it can easily make one feel rough. If that sounds like you, you need to think carefully about what the problem might be and how to address it. Ignoring a problem doesn’t make it go away.

Book the therapist appointment. Talk to the person. Find a solution to your problem. It’s hard, but you’ll come out of it so much better.

3. Get a Shower and Get Dressed

shower-1027904_960_720

In depressive episodes, some people have trouble going outside or even getting out of bed. If you’re reading this from your couch or bed and you haven’t done anything else today, get a shower.

Then get dressed. You don’t have to wear anything fancy or wear makeup unless you want to – just wear something comfortable and clean. Wash your hair and brush your teeth. This is step three; don’t skip it.

4. Clean Your Room

cleaning-381089_960_720

With zero motivation and that dull ache in your chest, cleaning anything at all might seem impossible right now. However, if cleaning your room or your house is too difficult, take these small steps.

  • Make your bed.
  • Put your dirty clothes in the washing machine.

Already, you’ve made huge steps. If this is all you can manage now, that’s completely fine.

  • Turn on the washing machine.
  • Pick up stuff from the floor.
  • Take out the trash.

Fantastic work! Already, the house/apartment is starting to look and smell better. Bonus points if you can:

  • Vacuum your room.
  • Hang up/dry the clothes after they’ve been washed.
  • Wash the dishes.
  • Organise your books, games, and DVDs.
  • Clean your desk.
  • Change your bed sheets.

If you can manage to clean your living space, it can equal a clearer mind and a better mood. Now you are clean and so is your home. This isn’t a depression cure, but it certainly helps.

5. Cry

girl-2096998_960_720

Crying can let out a lot of anguish and emotional pain… for some people. If crying isn’t something you want to make yourself do, feel free to skip this step.

However, if you’re the kind of person who feels better after a good cry, put on a movie that you know will have you reaching for the tissues (Titanic, The Notebook, The Boy in Striped Pyjamas, Ghost, and Schindler’s List are all good choices) or listen to some “emo” music and let the tears flow. You may feel surprisingly light afterward.

6. Make a Plan for Self-Improvement

write-593333_960_720

Depression strangles you and stops you from finding the fun in anything. Your motivation takes a kick and you find yourself thinking that you’ll never find joy ever again.

If you can, try to remember when you were a kid and what hopes you had for the future. For example, you may have always wanted to be an actor or travel the world. Make a plan, including all the steps you have to take the achieve your goal, even if it’s a really big one. This can be anything: write a song, learn to play an instrument, start learning a new language, travel to another continent, etc.

You don’t necessarily have to carry out the plan, but making one can make you feel optimistic, excited, and give you a glimmer of hope for the future. Don’t worry about the plan being too abstract or difficult; it’s making the plan that can make you feel good.

7. Do Something Nice for Someone Else

hand-1549224_960_720

A lot of negative thoughts that come with depression include self-hatred, a low opinion of oneself, and the belief that the world would be better without you in it. Words won’t change this, but actions can.

Think of someone who needs help. Do something for them, no matter how small or insignificant it may seem to them. Listen to their problem. Tell them they look nice (as long as you mean it). Watch their YouTube video and leave a comment. Read their book and leave a review. Take care of their baby for the afternoon while they take a break.

Doing something nice for another person can really boost your self-worth, and even if it does nothing at all to make you feel better, at least you’ve made someone else’s day.

8. Call or Text a Family Member

telephone-586268_960_720

Got an aunt, cousin, or grandma who you haven’t spoken to in a while? Pick up your phone and contact them. If you’re not up to a phone call, a WhatsApp message will suffice. They will be glad to hear from you and you’ll be able to get your mind off things while you catch up.

You could also do this with an old friend who you haven’t spoken to in a long time. Check your Facebook, Instagram, or any other account and see if there are people you haven’t hit up in a while. They will appreciate it and you’ll be strengthening relationships, too.

9. Talk to Someone

woman-2880999_960_720

If you’ve done all these things and you still feel rotten, try talking to someone close to you about how you’ve been feeling. Be sure to choose someone who you know has empathy and who will give you their full attention. Offloading can help a lot, and sometimes by saying your problems aloud, you can even figure out your own solution.

10. Make Use of Online and Anonymous Help

Still feel terrible? First of all, I’m really sorry nothing on this list helped. It’s tough when you’re feeling really down and nothing seems to work. Here are a few resources you can make use of if you need someone to talk to anonymously.

  • 7 Cups of Tea, an anonymous online chat site with volunteer helpers and paid therapists
  • A suicide hotline (all countries) for if you’re in immediate danger
  • Samaritans. It’s British but you can email them from anywhere.
  • ElderWisdom to talk and get advice from seniors

Hopefully you can start to feel better as quickly as possible, because there are a lot of good things in this dark world. If you’re feeling down, please leave a comment or tweet to me and I’ll try and help you further. I’m not a professional, but I’m a human who is always willing to lend an ear! Good luck. 🙂

Pretty Yokohama

Day 29

Yesterday I met some people from university who I hadn’t seen for years. We went to Yokohama, the second biggest city in Japan and a short train ride away from Tokyo. Yokohama is relatively quiet, spacious for a Japanese city, and has an awesome Chinatown selling goods and food from (where else?) China. It also has a pretty big presence when Chinese New Year comes round in February.

The port is also really pretty and, like that day, we could see some ships getting ready to port. It’s much nicer on a sunny day but still made for a pretty impressive view.

We had lunch in Chinatown and then tucked into some coffee and pie at a cafe. It was a lot of sugar and calories but hey, it was a special day. We passed the small theme park, including the large Ferris wheel. It’s something which I always look at and think “that’s pretty,” while refusing to get on.

Pretty sunset

We did purikura, a photo booth where, as you can see, you can edit your photos after taking them. At just 100 yen each (400 yen per session), it wasn’t an expensive venture. LEP refers to the group we were in at university, and since it was 2012 since we all first met, we called that day the LEP Reunion.

Yokohama has a completely different vibe to Tokyo. In Yokohama, I always feel more relaxed with that “weekend feeling.” Still, I’ve never worked in Yokohama which is probably why. Still, everyone who has been to both cities would probably agree that Tokyo is the more hectic, if equally charming, of the two.

Oh, yeah. I also broke my shoe.

If you visit Tokyo, be sure to take a day trip to Yokohama, it’s a really cool place 🙂

Playing The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion Again

Day 28

Guyyyyyyys. It finally arrived.

Hnng.

The Elder Scrolls IV: Oblivion is a fantastic game and one that was played for thousands, probably millions of hours worldwide in the late 00s. As a lover of fantasy roleplaying games, I did my fair share of exploring, Oblivion gate closing, questing, and guilding. My younger brother, Calum, fell in love with the game and that was the first of many he ended up playing.

Upon finishing Skyrim and Dragon Age and listening to the Oblivion soundtrack I knew I needed to play it again. I never knew until recently (which might have saved me a lot of trouble) that the Japanese and the American PlayStations are the same; as in, you can play an American game on a Japanese console and vice-versa. I found Oblivion for a fairly reasonable price on Amazon, waited several weeks for it to arrive, and was suddenly jumping on the spot.

Would it be just as magical as when I first played it? Video game graphics have come along way since 2006. But as the music played, I was a happy teenager again, ready to dive into Tamriel and close shut the jaws of Oblivion.

Sometimes when you play a game for the nostalgia, it ends up being a bit disappointing. Last year, when I still had my Wii U, I downloaded Pokemon Snap which, to my delight, was available on the virtual console.

I finished it in about two hours thinking was that it? As a kid I spent weeks exploring the levels, taking photographs, collecting items and wondering where I needed to go to unlock new stages and new Pokemon. I’m not saying that it isn’t a good game; I just didn’t get the joy out of it that I did as a child because now I already know where all the secrets and items are.

Oblivion, however, is still as perfect and awesome and insane as it was twelve years ago, and I’m ready to waste time I could be spending reading, writing, or having a social life completing quests and helping Martin Septim realise his destiny as king. For the Emperor!

Reading “The Illustrated Mum” as a Child VS. Reading it as an Adult

Day 26

What was your favourite book when you were a child? I remember being about six or seven and getting a box set of Jacqueline Wilson books from my auntie. I read all of them many, many times and ended up getting even more of Wilson’s works. I was a big fan of hers; I still am.

With the Kindle and Kindle app, it’s great hunting down old books you loved and getting them on your e-reader within seconds. I’ve just finished The Illustrated Mum again, but the reading experience was pretty different from when I was eight.

If you’ve never read this book, it’s about a ten-year-old girl called Dolphin who lives with her older sister, Star, and their mother manic-depressive mother, Marigold.

Reading it as a kid, I saw the world from a child’s perspective and completely understood that Dolphin was confused and upset that Star was showing less and less interest in Marigold as she got older, angry at Star for leaving her mother and sister behind, and terrified alongside Dolphin when Marigold had rough spells of drinking or crazy shopping. Dolphin did her best to not let anyone, even her friend Oliver, see just how bad Marigold could get when she was in a state.

As an adult, I felt so much pity for the poor little girl we read about, her youth and unconditional admiration and love for her mother clouding the fact that she was much better off without her. I wanted to take care of Dolphin, to feed her and wash her properly and give her a warm and safe home. Reading as a kid and reading as an adult were two entirely different experiences.

Jacqueline Wilson has a remarkable gift for writing from the perspective of a child who really doesn’t know better. What does a ten-year-old know about bipolar disorder? Or about hospitals? She feels so bad for calling the ambulance when Marigold finally goes over the edge, yet we all know as readers that she did the right thing.

There are a few more really depressing (but awesome) Wilson books that I now can’t wait to read again. No doubt the experience will transform from an adult’s eyes, too.

A Trip on the Hogwarts Express

Day 25 [New Year’s Resolution]: A Trip on the Hogwarts Express

What’s your favourite childhood memory? A lot of the time, experiences from younger, more innocent times seem not only far away, but sort of magical because you know you’ll never get them back or feel that way again. One great memory I have is when my mum, her best friend Clarky, and my brother all got into the car one day. When we asked where we were going, they said it was a surprise.

This happened more often than you’d think. One time, we drove all the way down to Windsor to go to Legoland. Other times we’d go to bed on a normal night and wake up in the car park overlooking the pebbly shores of Portree for a surprise holiday on the Isle of Skye.

So when my brother and I got into the car at seven and nine years old, respectively (if I’m correct in thinking that this was 2002), we were pretty excited, making wild guesses all the way to York. I hadn’t been there before, but of course it would go on to be the city in which I went to university.

We arrived at York Station, and I remember thinking, even as a little kid, “why are we going to the train station when we just arrived by car?”

Our view was something like this:

Except there were a lot more people. Some, to mine and my brother’s bewilderment, were dressed as Harry Potter characters.

Then it happened. The scarlet steam train pulled up, so long I couldn’t see the end, and stopped before us. The exact train that takes Harry Potter to Hogwarts every year. The Wizard’s Express.

“Surprise!”

We went insane.

In short, the Wizard’s Express took us to Scarborough. We sat in a compartment, did a special Harry Potter quiz (I think only up to book four at that point), and bought a mass of Potter themed sweets, such as chocolate frogs, Bertie Bott’s Every Flavour Beans, Acid Pops, and a ton more inside a little cauldron.

It was the best. Now when I look back at all the effort my mum and Clarky put into it – back then, we didn’t have a computer, so it’s likely they looked it up in a magazine or newspaper – spent their hard earned money on tickets, packed everything we needed and then took us there, it makes me so warm and happy inside.

It isn’t possible to do a trip like this now, which I think is for several reasons:

  • In 2002, Harry Potter was popular, but not the billion-dollar industry it is now.
  • Tickets for a trip like that would probably be hundreds of pounds and have years of waiting lists.
  • Another reason, as some of you might know, is that the actual Wizard’s Express currently only has two carriages and is at the National Railway Museum.

Even back then I was writing books, and I briefly had a story in progress that involved a school trip where the kids travel around the world on the Hogwarts Express, a sort of mixture between The Magic School Bus and a Jacqueline Wilson book.

That trip is still a hugely fond memory. No one else I knew had done it, and I never saw it advertised again after that. After The Prisoner of Azkaban movie came out in 2004, Harry Potter gained a massive following, so it wasn’t really special and personal anymore. That’s OK though, because as far as I’m concerned, only me, my brother, Mum, and Clarky, as well as a few other people who were there that day, have ever taken that magical journey from York to Scarborough and back on the Hogwarts Express.

If We Could All Discover Our Love for Reading

book-419589_960_720

Last year, I played a lot of video games. I worked a lot. I bought hamsters. I even wrote a bit.

After re-reading the Harry Potter series, I realised with an unpleasant drop in my stomach that last year I hardly read anything at all. There were some indie books, some work-related stuff, and… well, that’s it, really.

I had lunch with one of my students after a lesson yesterday and she was asking me about all these famous western writers, asking if I’d heard of them or read their work. Her eager little face looked so disappointed when I said I hadn’t even heard of most of them. She seemed surprised that I, a native speaker of English, didn’t know about all her favourite novels that she struggled through as a learner of our complex language.

I felt really bad. So I decided this year that I’m going to spend a lot more time reading. There are loads of books in the spare room I bought or was given and never even opened. Worlds waiting to be explored, characters waiting to be known, pages waiting to be turned. I am shocked it took this long.

read-369040_960_720

We’re so distracted by social media and the busy pace of life that most of us have forgotten what it’s like to curl up with a book (paperback OR electronic; there’s no shame in owning a Kindle). There’s really no excuse; people who claim to love books, yet say they are too busy to read yet spend three hours a day on Facebook, what are you doing? I’m determined not to be one of those people.

So hopefully you’ll see a lot more posts about awesome books in the coming months!

Meet My Hamsters

Did you have a childhood pet? I think kids were pretty much divided growing up: the family who had a cat, the family who had a dog, the family where one or both parents hated animals, and the family that couldn’t or wouldn’t have a larger animal and had some kind of rodent.

I vaguely remember we had a cat at some point, and we had this big grey hamster that was scared of everything.

About a year ago I was thinking about getting a pet, something I could take care of that was a bit more impressive than a fish. They eat fish here, anyway; if I had one, every time I’d come home with some sushi I’d feel guilty.

Hamsters are sweet little things and affordable, too. To celebrate getting my job last year, I went to a pet shop in Daikanyama and got Shakespeare. He was old and he nibbled, but he was such a little prince. We had a happy six months together before he died of old age.

It didn’t take long to get lonely after he died, so one day I impulse bought a pair of hamsters. I named the boy Hemingway, continuing the trend of naming them after famous writers, and I named the girl Zelda after the princess.

Hemingway is very affectionate and Zelda is more feisty. I had to separate them so they wouldn’t have babies and my second cage was a very small one, so I think she was mad at me for a while. Eventually I gave in and bought her the same three-story house in pink.

She got a lot friendlier after that.

If you want a pet but you’re not sure what to get, I definitely recommend a hamster; they’re easy to look after and they don’t really get lonely if you’re too busy to play with them every day.

They’re really easy to tame and they’ll eat leftover vegetables as well.

And they’re really very sweet.

Tell me about your pets!

Winter in Tokyo

It’s really really really cold today. The snow has made things a bit mental in other prefectures; a train in Niigata was stopped for fifteen and a half hours, trapping over 400 people on board, and one or two elderly people have died because of collapsing houses under the snow.

Tokyo doesn’t have snow, thankfully, but it’s still pretty biting. Insulation here is awful, so if you don’t have the heater on, cold air penetrates your room whether you’re in a house, a block of flats, or the office.

It really makes me miss home. At least when it’s cold, you’ll feel the warmth as soon as you walk inside. Right now, we get inside our house and have to turn the heater on as soon as we walk in, waiting around fifteen minutes before it’ll heat up the room. Just that room. No central heating here.

エアコン・女性

Every time I feel like I hate winter, though, I remind myself of the cockroaches that found their way into our bathroom (not an infestation; there are just a lot of them around when it’s hot) last summer. Cockroaches are terrifying, so maybe cold fingers, and taking twenty minutes to get your bed warm at night is an acceptable alternative. Maybe.

At least I’m not dealing with snow. I shudder to imagine the amount of yuki gakki (snow shovelling) is going on near my old place up in Nagano Prefecture. Still, there are many great things about winter, too: hot beverages and soup inside vending machines, winter sports, heat-tech wear, winter illuminations, etc etc etc.

Bottom line is that it’s cold.

10 Things Guidebooks Don’t Tell You About Living in Japan

Day 13 [New Year’s Resolution]: 10 Things They Don’t Tell You About Living in Japan

Howdy, gang.

Thousands of people from around the world flock to live in Japan, whether it’s to teach English, travel as many prefectures as they can, or settle down and start a family. Some stay for less than a year, and others stay for decades.

Since Japan is such a popular country, there are many websites and blogs where you can find out about Japanese culture, events, food, customs, and the language. However, these tend to paint Japan in a light that makes it look perfect. I work for one of those websites, and any articles that make Japan look even a little bit bad are dismissed immediately.

I’ve been living in Japan for nearly five years now; eighteen months in Okaya, Nagano Prefecture, and two and a half years in Tokyo, the capital city. Although I love it here, there are a lot of downsides as well that you can’t really find a lot of information about online. Here are 10 things that guidebooks and blogs don’t tell you about living in Japan.

1. You Are Always a Foreigner

tulips-2580116_960_720

Coming from the UK where we treat everyone equally and don’t care if someone’s black, white, or purple with polka dots, it’s very weird to still be considered “a foreigner” even after being here since I was nineteen.

It’s the first thing people notice about me, and almost everyone’s first question is “Where are you from?” and the first remark is “Oh, you can speak Japanese!”

It’s not really that much of a problem, but even my boyfriend does it. “Look, a white guy!” I find myself irritably replying “So what?”

Learn the language, get a job in a well-respected company, learn all the complicated customs and rules and manners, it doesn’t matter – you’ll always be a gaikokujin.

2. It’s Very Difficult to Rent a House

writing-1149962_960_720

There are a hundred and one rules involved if you’re a non-Japanese person hoping to rent a house. There are all kinds of fees including bond, deposit, key money, etc etc, and you need some kind of written recommendation.

I’m really lucky because in Nagano, my company sorted out my house, and in Tokyo, my boyfriend sorted it out. I’ve never had to personally deal with renting a place on my own so I don’t know all the ins and outs, but there’s a good article on GaijinPot all about it.

3. No One Has a Proper Oven

As someone who loves her pies and lasagnas, this drives me crazy. The only ovens you can really find are a sort of mixture between an oven and a microwave, and the same size as that, too. Unless you’re willing to invest tens of thousands of yen, oven dishes aren’t an option if you like to cook. Boo.

4. It’s Hard to Find Good Cheese

cheese-1972744_960_720

Of course you’ll want to try the delicious local food that’s on offer in Japan, but sometimes you want a little taste of home. Cheese is one of the things that the Japanese just can’t seem to get right. The much-boasted Hokkaido cheese is supposed to be fantastic, but compared to the rich and sharp cheddars from home, it’s pizza-topping tier.

You can find imported cheeses in certain shops, but then you’re expected to cough up for it. I managed to find some Brie the other day from Kaldi Coffee, and after wincing at the price tag, enjoyed it very much.

5. Everything is Scripted

woman-bowing_preview

Back home, I can walk into a shop and easily have a chat with a shop assistant about anything. It’s friendly, it’s good customer service, and it makes the company look good. However, as soon as I walk into a shop I know I’m going to hear the welcoming phrase “irasshaimase“, the amount of money I owe the cashier, and the thank-yous when I leave.

It’s not for lack of trying, either. I’ve tried to chat with people many times in shops only to have a very startled, nervous, and short reply, or to have them ignore me completely or look at me like I’ve grown a tit on my forehead. It’s quite lonely.

6. You’ll Miss Things from Your Home Country

english-2421038_960_720

Although you may not believe it when you first arrive, you will definitely end up missing stuff from your home country after a couple of months, especially food. That condiment that you can find in every cafe at home but doesn’t exist here. Your favourite brand of tea. Good chocolate. Decent deodorant.

Still, that’s what care packages are for. Be sure to send yourself some essentials before you go.

7. Everything is Tiny

Mind your head warning sign, on white background

If you’re tall in Japan, you’re going to have a bad time. It takes a bit of getting used to, as doorways, food portions, furniture, and many other things will make you feel like you’ve grown several inches or everything else has shrunk.

Couple that with the fact that the average height in Japan for men is 5″7, and you’ll feel like a wandering giant. The wandering foreigner.

8. People are Fake

No, not everyone. But as someone who grew up with a father who was more forward than most people and didn’t care who knew it, it’s really hard for me to get used to a society where people say “yes” when they mean no, “maybe” when they mean “hell no,” and “sure, you can trust me with this information” when the next thing you know they’re blabbing to unfriendly ears.

A lesson I learned the hard way is to not share things that can be used against you unless you absolutely 100% trust that person. Learn to read between the lines and read body language (tilting their head to the side with a smile/frown often means “no”). It’s a pain.

It’s all part of the politeness thing, but there’s a massive difference between being polite and being fake.

9. Everything is Ridiculously Over-Packaged

This isn’t really a bad thing, I suppose, but the amount of nagging we get in Europe about reducing, reusing, and recycling! Then you buy a box of sweets as a souvenir and hey-ho, you have to battle through three boxes and a plastic bag before you can finally get your (unexpectedly tiny) sweet. Next time you buy anything in Japan, take a look at the packaging. It isn’t normal.

10. Drinking a Lot is Normal

drink beer_preview

Japan has one of the world’s highest life expectancies and this is said to be down to a lot of factors: better diets, healthier lifestyles, and more exercise. Despite this, drinking in Japan is huge. It’s not only okay to drink several times a week, but in some jobs, it’s expected.

Many companies engage in nomikai, a party where the boss and his employees go out to a local izakaya pub or bar to drink themselves silly. Seeing passed out young men in suits at train stations in the wee hours is a pretty normal sight.

This attitude towards drinking leaks into the lives of those who aren’t businessmen as well. I find myself surprised when I realise I haven’t had alcohol in a few days, and my boyfriend loves to go out and get wasted from time to time without even thinking of it as a potential problem.

It’s good news if you love to drink, though, as western men are often admired for being “osake tsuyoi,” or having a high resistance to alcohol. You might find that your alcohol intake, and in turn, your weight, increases while you live here unless you don’t drink at all.

The good things about Japan outweigh the bad by far, which is why I’m still here! No country is perfect, though, and it’s important to know the downsides before you arrive so you can prepare for them. Whether you count all of the above as downsides or not is up to you.